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The Family Tree of Benjamin Hoadly, Bishop of Winchester (1676-1761)
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Family of Bellingham BOYLE and Sarah HOADLY

Husband: Bellingham BOYLE (1709-1771)
Wife: Sarah HOADLY ( - )
Children: John BOYLE ( -1826)
(Male) BOYLE ( -aft1771)
Anne BOYLE (1742- )
Male FEMALE BOYLE ( - )
Male FEMALE BOYLE ( - )
Male FEMALE BOYLE ( - )
Male FEMALE BOYLE ( - )
Male FEMALE BOYLE ( - )
Marriage 29 Nov 1740

Husband: Bellingham BOYLE

Name: Bellingham BOYLE
Sex: Male
Father: -
Mother: -
Birth 1709
Occupation M.p. For Brandon Bridge
Death 11 May 1771 (age 61-62) Merrion Square, Dublin

Wife: Sarah HOADLY

Name: Sarah HOADLY
Sex: Female
Father: John HOADLY (Archbishop) (1678-1746)
Mother: Anne WARRE ( - )
Birth "?"

Child 1: John BOYLE

Name: John BOYLE
Sex: Male
Death 5 Mar 1826 London

Child 2: (Male) BOYLE

Name: (Male) BOYLE
Sex: Male
Death aft 1771

Child 3: Anne BOYLE

Name: Anne BOYLE
Sex: Female
Spouse: Robert LANGRISHE ( - )
Birth 10 Apr 1742
Death "abt 14 Feb 1835" Merton, near Cullinawood

Child 4: Male FEMALE BOYLE

Name: Male FEMALE BOYLE
Sex: Male

Child 5: Male FEMALE BOYLE

Name: Male FEMALE BOYLE
Sex: Male

Child 6: Male FEMALE BOYLE

Name: Male FEMALE BOYLE
Sex: Male

Child 7: Male FEMALE BOYLE

Name: Male FEMALE BOYLE
Sex: Male

Child 8: Male FEMALE BOYLE

Name: Male FEMALE BOYLE
Sex: Male

Note on Husband: Bellingham BOYLE (1)

In 1742, [Rathfarnham] castle was sold to Dr. Hoadly, Archbishop of Armagh, and on his death four years later it passed to his son-in-law Bellingham Boyle. In 1767, he sold the property to Nicholas Loftus, second Earl of Ely, a descendant of Adam Loftus, the original builder of the castle.

Note on Husband: Bellingham BOYLE (2)

Rathfarnham Castle then passed to Mr. Bellingham Boyle, who had married, in November, 1740, Archbishop Hoadly's only daughter and child a young lady who inherited her father's taste for country pursuits.

 

Dean Swift, who subsequently expressed great distress at hearing she had the smallpox, in one of his delightful letters thanks her for a pig and a bowl of butter which she had sent to him, and threatens to tell all the ladies of his acquaintance that the sole daughter and child of his Grace of Dublin is so mean as to descend to understand housewifery, and to show her letter to every female scrawler in order that they may spread about the town that her writing and spelling are ungenteel and unfashionable, and more like a parson's than a lady's.

 

Bellingham Boyle, who was nephew of Henry Boyle, then Speaker of the House of Commons, and afterwards Earl of Shannon, and who represented Bandon in Parliament proceeded, after his marriage, to his LL.D. degree in Dublin University, became a Governor of the Workhouse in room of Mr. Balthazar Cramer, and a trustee of the linen manufacture, and on the recommendation of his father-in-law and uncle was appointed a Commissioner of the Revenue.

 

Boyle and his wife were prominent in the Dublin society of their day, and William, fourth Duke of Devonshire, while Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, recognised their high position in society by dining with them at Rathfarnham when on his way to spend some days at Powerscourt.

 

An advertisement of property stolen in 1751 from the Castle of Rathfarnham sets forth at length descriptions of various gorgeous articles of apparel, including a suit of clothes of bloom colour, cross-barred and flowered with silver; another suit of yellow colour, brocaded with silver and colours; a third suit of lute string striped and brocaded on a white ground; a grey duchess night-gown; a velvet mantle of cherry colour lined with white satin and bordered with ermine; and a piece of white satin quilted for a petticoat, embroidered with vine leaves in shades of green and brown stalks.

 

In the midst of political intrigues, in which he is said to have been allied with the astute Philip Tisdal, Boyle found time to superintend the farming of his demesne, and sent in July, 1762, from Rathfarnham to the Dublin market the earliest oats ever grown in Ireland. Five years later - a few years before his death-he disposed for £17,500 of the castle and demesne.

 

http://www.chaptersofdublin.com/books/ball1-6/Ball2/ball2.4.html

Note on Husband: Bellingham BOYLE (3)

1727- A new Parliament assembled in Dublin. The members for Bandon were:-Brigadier the Hon. George Freke, and Stephen Bernard, Castle Bernard. Brigadier Freke died in 1731, and was succeeded by Bellingham Boyle, of Glenfield, Rathfarnham, Dublin. The return of both of these representatives was indentured by William Lapp, the provost, and several of the burgesses. Thomas Evans and Edward Hoare, Esqs., were also returned for the town, their return being duly authenticated by John Bourne, provost elect, and many of the freemen.

Upon these returns being sent up, the House ordered that the clerk of the crown do attend immediately and take off the file the indenture by which the said Mr. Evans and Mr. Hoare were returned. It was further ordered that the said Mr. Evans and Mr. Hoare have liberty to petition the House within fourteen days, if they think fit, in relation to the election of the said borough.

 

http://www.paulturner.ca/Ireland/Cork/HOB/hob-17.htm

Note on Husband: Bellingham BOYLE (4)

However, the estates passed out of the family hands due to the dissolute life of the archbishop’s descendant, Philip Wharton (1698-1731), Duke of Wharton, whose gambling debts forced him to sell his inheritance to Speaker Conolly for £62,000 in 1723. When Conolly died in 1729, Rathfarnham and the neighbouring estates passed to his nephews, Thomas Conolly, MP, and then William Conolly, MP.

 

In 1742, the Conolly family sold Rathfarnham to the Archbishop of Dublin, Dr John Hoadly (1678-1746), who had rebuilt the episcopal palace at Tallaght Castle. Archbishop Hoadly lovingly lavished money on the restoration of Rathfarnham Castle and made it his home. He died in 1746 and was buried in Saint Maelruain’s Church, Tallaght. His son-in-law, Bellingham Boyle, sold Rathfarnham Castle and demesne back to the Loftus family in 1767 for a mere £17,500.

 

http://revpatrickcomerford.blogspot.com/2008_11_13_archive.html

Note on Husband: Bellingham BOYLE (5)

In 1742, the Conolly family sold the former Loftus and Wharton estates to the new Archbishop of Dublin, Dr John Hoadly (1678-1746), who had rebuilt the episcopal palace at Tallaght Castle. When Rathfarnham Castle came into his possession, Archbishop Hoadly lavished money on its restoration. Although he was appointed Archbishop of Armagh that same year, he repaired the castle and made it his home. He died in Rathfarnham Castle of a fever on 19 July 1746 and was buried with his wife in Saint Maelruain’s Church, Tallaght. His Rathfarnham estates then passed to his daughter Sarah and her husband, Bellingham Boyle, a nephew of the Earl of Shannon.

 

There is a curious tale in this circuitous route of inheritance, for Bellingham Boyle was a third cousin of Philip Wharton: Philip’s great-grandmother, Lady Dorothy Loftus, was a sister of Boyle’s great-grandfather, Roger Boyle, 1st Earl of Orrery. Five days before his death in 1767, Bellingham Boyle sold Rathfarnham Castle and demesne for a mere £17,500, one-fifth of the £85,000 sought and less than one-third of the £62,000 received by Philip Wharton when he sold the estates almost half a century earlier.

 

http://revpatrickcomerford.blogspot.com/2008_09_27_archive.html

Note on Wife: Sarah HOADLY (1)

Archbishop Hoadly was a great agriculturist. His daughter, and only child, who married Bellingham Boyle, had similar tastes; and, in an amusing letter, Swift thanks her for a pig and some butter which she had sent hint from Tallaght. She was a favourite of the Dean; he commends her love of housewifery and good sense, and writes on one occasion in great distress on hearing she was ill with the smallpox.

Note on Wife: Sarah HOADLY (2)

Extract from the probate (PCC) of the will (22 Jun 1774) of John Hoadly, clerk, LLD, chancellor of the diocese of Winchester, 4 Apr 1776; nd, (watermark 1863) AMS4945 c1863

 

Contents:

Bequeaths his 'freehold family estate' in Uckfield, occupied by Mrs Mickelbourne, late the Widow Whapham, to his wife Elizabeth for life, remainder to the heirs of his cousin Sarah Boyle, widow of Bellingham Boyle, esq, of Ireland and daughter of his uncle, Primate [John] Hoadly, [archbishop of Dublin and Armagh]

Note on Wife: Sarah HOADLY (3)

Rathfarnham Castle then passed to Mr. Bellingham Boyle, who

had married, in November, 1740, Archbishop Hoadly's only

daughter and child - a young lady who inherited her father's taste

for country pursuits. Dean Swift, who subsequently expressed

great distress at hearing she had the smallpox, in one of his

delightful letters thanks her for a pig and a bowl of butter which

she had sent to him, and threatens to tell all the ladies of his

acquaintance that the sole daughter and child of his Grace of

Dublin is so mean as to descend to understand housewifery, and

to show her letter to every female scrawler in order that they

may spread about the town that her writing and spelling are

ungenteel and unfashionable, and more like a parson's than a

lady's.