See also

Family of Charles George Harvey COOPER and Sarah Catherine WALDECK

Husband: Charles George Harvey COOPER (1827-1886)
Wife: Sarah Catherine WALDECK (1837-1923)
Children: Frederick Hellyar COOPER (1861-1861)
Charles Frederick COOPER (1862- )
Lucy Harrison COOPER (1864-1948)
Thomas Harvey COOPER (1865-1918)
Rose Fredericka COOPER (1868-1954)
William Hellyar COOPER (1870-1932)
George COOPER (1873-1873)
Ashley COOPER (1874-1936)
Alfred George COOPER (1881-1939)
Marriage 10 Apr 1860 Perth, Western Australia1

Husband: Charles George Harvey COOPER

Name: Charles George Harvey COOPER
Sex: Male
Father: Frederick Hellyar COOPER (bef1800-1866)
Mother: Lucy Harrison HARVEY (bef1798-1855)
Birth 17 Dec 1827 Walworth, Surrey2
Seymour Place, Walworth, Surrey
Baptism 15 Jun 1828 (age 0) Newington, Surrey3
St Mary Newington, Southwark, Surrey
Residence 15 Jun 1828 (age 0) Newington, Surrey3
Seymour Place, Newington, Surrey
Census 6 Jun 1841 (age 14) Camberwell, Surrey4
Havil Street, Camberwell, Surrey
Court Case 17 Dec 1849 (age 22) Central Criminal Court
Old Bailey
Convicted for ten years transportation for burglary.
Census 30 Mar 1851 (age 23) Portland, Dorset5
Portland Convict Prison
Occupation 30 Mar 1851 (age 23) Prisoner; Portland, Dorset5
Occupation Chief Clerk To Solicitor1
Transported 30 Dec 1853 (age 26) Perth, Western Australia
Transported on the Sea Park
Death 26 Dec 1886 (age 59) Perth, Western Australia1,6

Wife: Sarah Catherine WALDECK

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Sarah Catherine WALDECK

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Sarah Catherine WALDECK

Name: Sarah Catherine WALDECK1
Sex: Female
Father: Frederick G. WALDECK (1807-1895)
Mother: Fredericka Wilhemina Lucia KNIEST (1811-1905)
Birth 16 May 1837 Perth, Western Australia7
Death 28 Dec 1923 (age 86) Claremont, Western Australia

Child 1: Frederick Hellyar COOPER

Name: Frederick Hellyar COOPER1
Sex: Male
Birth 1 Mar 1861 Perth, Western Australia1
Death 28 Nov 1861 (age 0) Greenough, Western Australia1

Child 2: Charles Frederick COOPER

Name: Charles Frederick COOPER1
Sex: Male
Birth 1862

Child 3: Lucy Harrison COOPER

Name: Lucy Harrison COOPER1
Sex: Female
Spouse: Robert Dring O'GRADY (1860-1901)
Birth 1864 Perth, Western Australia1
Death 22 Aug 1948 (age 83-84) Claremont, Western Australia1

Child 4: Thomas Harvey COOPER

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Thomas Harvey COOPER, 1918, age 53

Name: Thomas Harvey COOPER1
Sex: Male
Nickname: Tombo
Birth 1865 Perth, Western Australia1
Death 1 Mar 1918 (age 52-53) Perth, Western Australia1

Child 5: Rose Fredericka COOPER

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Spouse: Arthur Dundas HICKS

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Spouse: Arthur Dundas HICKS

Name: Rose Fredericka COOPER1
Sex: Female
Spouse: Arthur Dundas HICKS ( - )
Birth 1868 Perth, Western Australia1
Death 13 Aug 1954 (age 85-86) in Serpentine, Western Australia

Child 6: William Hellyar COOPER

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William Hellyar COOPER, 1924, age 54

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William Hellyar COOPER, 1924, age 54

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William Hellyar COOPER, 1898, age 28

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Spouse: Elsie Charlotte HATFIELD, 1924, age 46

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Spouse: Elsie Charlotte HATFIELD, 1924, age 46

Name: William Hellyar COOPER1
Sex: Male
Spouse: Elsie Charlotte HATFIELD (1878-1931)
Birth 1870 Perth, Western Australia
Occupation Publican At Marble Bar1
Death 18 Jul 1932 (age 61-62) Nedlands, Western Australia1

Child 7: George COOPER

Name: George COOPER1
Sex: Male
Birth 1873 Perth, Western Australia1
Death 1873 (age 0) Perth, Western Australia1

Child 8: Ashley COOPER

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Ashley COOPER

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Spouse: Mary Jane BELL, 1912, age 34

Name: Ashley COOPER1
Sex: Male
Spouse: Mary Jane BELL (1878-1925)
Birth 18 Jul 1874 Perth, Western Australia1
Birth Reg. No. 15779/1874
Occupation Clerk, Plan Room, Lands Dept.1
Death 22 Oct 1936 (age 62) Claremont, Western Australia1
Cause: Died as a result of a motor vehicle accident whilst on Long Service Leave prior to retirement (Punctured lung, following car accident)
Death Reg. No. 1882/1936
Burial 1936 Karrakatta, Western Australia
Karrakatta Cemetery, Karrakatta, Western Australia
Buried Karrakatta Cemetery Wesleyan Section AA Plot No 0169 with parents siblings and wife

Child 9: Alfred George COOPER

Name: Alfred George COOPER1
Sex: Male
Spouse: Ida Emma POLLARD ( - )
Birth 1881 Perth, Western Australia
Death 9 Dec 1939 (age 57-58) Pymble, New South Wales

Note on Husband: Charles George Harvey COOPER (1)

Charles George Harvey Cooper is our own CONVICT!

He was sentenced at the Old Bailey for ten years for burglary.

He spent time at Portland Prison, Dorset, Pentonville and Millbank, from whence he was transported to Perth, Australia.

 

These are his details as a prisoner:

 

Prisoner 2949 Chas. Cooper, age 23, weight 9 stone 3 lbs.

 

received from Millbank on 5 March 1850.

He was single with no children.

Father: FREDk Cooper, Clerk, of 2 Hanover Place, Old Kent Road (Incidently that is Alfred Cooper’s 1851 Census address!)

Chas’s occupation: Solicitors’ Clerk

Good character (!!)

Tried 17 December 1849.

Tried at Central Criminal Courts

On the second page

 

Crime – Burglary

Sentence 10 years

BUT NO OTHER CONVICITONS!!!

Conduct in Pentonville – good

Places and period of separate confinement – Millbank for 1 .18 months

Discharged on 27 January 1851 to Portland.

 

As his Great Grand-daughter, Ainslie commented:

 

Chas. Cooper, Prisoner 2849, Convict No. 2779, is also the eminently respectable Charles George Harvey Cooper – clerk to the Advocate General, and Senior Law Clerk to Stone and Burt!!

 

Upon our rather exciting discovery, Ainslie has written:

 

Charles George Harvey Cooper

 

Born 17 December 1827 in Walworth, Surrey, England

Died 26 December 1886, Perth, Western Australia

 

Whatever drove him to commit the crime of burglary for which he was charged,

or whether indeed, he was not guilty of the crime,

he overcame the disgrace, degradation and desperation

of a sentence of 10 years transportation over the seas.

He endured the indignities and deprivations

of the penal system which frequently broke a lesser man

to establish himself as a highly esteemed member of society

with strong ties to the Wesleyan Church,

the Working Men's Institute, and Temperance Union.

He held a position of responsibility and

with his wife raised a family who were also highly regarded

members of the community of Western Australia.

In his obituary in the "Daily News" of December 28th 1886

the following words are included

"His memory will be cherished by every person

with whom he came in contact."

Would that we all deserved this epitaph.

 

I am not ashamed of the "convict stain", but so very proud, to have an ancestor

who had this amazing strength of character and ability

to triumph over such tremendous adversities.

 

Charles, I salute you!

Note on Husband: Charles George Harvey COOPER (2)

The Trial of Charles George Harvey Cooper:

 

(This was transcribed by his Great Grand-daughter, Ainslie Sharpe):

 

Transcript

of the trial of

 

 

CHARLES COOPER

And

WILLIAM RHODES

 

On

 

 

17th December 1849

At the

 

 

CENTRAL CRIMINAL COURTS

LONDON.

 

 

Because of poor quality, the following has been transcribed

from microfiche copy

of the proceedings of the

central criminal courts, London, Second Session, 1849-1850.

Pages 200-203

 

213. WILLIAM RHODES and CHARLES COOPER, burglariously breaking

and entering the dwelling-house of George Mence, with intent to steal.—2nd

Count, for burglariously breaking out of the said dwelling-house—Other

Counts, stating it to be the dwelling-house of Thomas Grueber and others.

Mr Ballantine conducted the prosecution.

 

Thomas Grueber.

 

I am a partner in the firm of Dodd, Grueber and Howsell,

solicitors, of 5, Billiter-street—we are the lessees of the house, and underlet

the ground-floor to the London General Pension Society—we occupy the first

floor, part of the second, and an office at the back of the house. The prisoner

Cooper was formerly in our service; I think he came in 1842, and was dis-

charged about twelve months ago—I did not sleep in the house—Mr. Mence,

to whom we let the upper part, does—the house is in the parish of St. Cath-

erine Cree—on Thursday, 6th Dec., I left the office at half-past two o’clock—I

went again about ten next morning, and was then told that the prisoners

were in custody—I examined the premises, and found the door into the clerk’s

office had been broken open—in the second desk in that office, belonging to

one of our confidential clerks, was kept the key of the iron sage and cash-

box—the cash-box was kept in the safe—Cooper would know that—I saw

marks on the desk which corresponded with a jemmy that was shown me by

the police—the other desk was not tried at all—I examined a closet under the

stairs, and found a quantity of torn envelopes and papers there– the cupboard

was large enough to hold two persons, if they wanted to conceal themselves—

there was a little bit of string inside—I examined the staircase, and found

that the persons got into the cupboard by putting their feet on a leaden water-

pipe which runs along there.

 

Cross examined by Mr Clarkson.

 

Q. Did you find anything denoting anybody had got into the closet by means of the pipe?

 

A. The pipe bore foot-marks—any persons could get into the cupboard without any difficulty from

that pipe—it comes nearly flush with the door—the inner door is never open

in the day time, unless anybody leaves it open on coming in—the outer one is

always open– no one belonging to the firm sleeps in the house—there was no

breaking of the outer door– there is no door for Mr. Mence; the same door

leads to all the floors– the clerk’s office door on the first floor was broken

open– after the clerks leave, the housekeeper locks up; she is not here.

 

Mr Ballantine.

 

Q. There is an outer door and then an inner door leading to the chambers in the house?

 

A. Yes, the cupboard is on the staircase—I left two of the clerks there, to the best of my recollection, on 6th Dec.—the of-

fice door was broken—the policeman produced an instrument to me which fit-

ted it—it was quite clear the door had been broken open.

 

George Mence.

 

I am secretary to the London General Pension Society

and occupy portion of 5, Billiter-street, a tenant to Messrs. Dodds and Co.

The Pension Society occupies the ground-floor, and I occupy a part of the sec-

ond, and the whole of the upper part. On 6th Dec. I went to bed at twenty

minutes to one o’clock in the morning—the house was then quite safe– the in-

ner office door was closed– about half past two in the morning, I was awoke

by a loud noise which appeared to come from the first floor– I lighted a can-

dle, and went out to the landing, and called to my servants; I thought the

noise came from them—I called out very loud; I awoke them; they answered

so as to convince me that they were not the cause of the noise—I then called

out “Take care; there are persons in the house who ought not to be, “ and I

called out very loud indeed twice, “ I am coming down; I am coming down” -I

then ran to the bed-room window in front of the house, and shouted “Police!”

as loud as I could—I then heard what appeared to me to be the street door

open, and I saw two men run from it towards the top of the street; one ap-

peared to run from the house, and the other to run under the eave of the

house—I was only able to see them, not to identify them—I observed the one

who ran on the other side had a lighter coat than the other—when I went

down stairs I found the front room first floor door lock forcibly broken—that

was the door I had seen safe at half-past twelve– part of the wood was splin-

tered, and the bolt of the lock remained as if locked—when I went round the

house, the cupboard was shut, and after the alarm it was open—when I went

down, I let in the policeman.

 

Cooper.

 

Q. How many times did you call “Police”?

 

A. I should say at least a dozen times—the police came before I had called half-a-dozen times.

 

Cross examined.

 

Do you mean to swear you heard the opening and shutting of the door?

 

A. I do not—I did not see any one in the house—the outer

door is open during the day, except on Sundays—I have nothing to do with

Messrs. Dodd’s office.

 

Mr. Ballantine.

 

Q. Was the outer door open or shut when you went to

bed.

 

A. Shut, and the private staircase door, and also the door which was af-

terwards broken.

 

John Smith (City-policeman, 611).

 

On Friday morning, 7th Dec., I was

on duty in Leadenhall-street, and at a quarter to three heard a cry of “Police!”

from 5, Billiter-street-I ran towards the house, and when I came within sight

of it, I saw the two prisoners rush out from the door of No. 5—they stood for a

few seconds until I crossed near them, and Cooper went to the opposite side—

Rhodes stood still—I thought to secure him, and he made a side bounce out of

the centre, and they both started off towards Leadenhall-street—there is a

gas-light over the house-door—I have not the shadow of a doubt that they are

the persons—I tried to catch both, and called “Stop thief?” -I met Sergeant

Tregaskis at Leadenhall-Street, and the prisoners were secured—I saw Rho-

des taken; I am sure he is the person—I saw Cooper at the station after-

wards—I searched Rhodes, and found on him a box of lucifers, a file, a bunch

of small keys, a George the Second coin, a little bottle containing oil—I knew

Cooper directly he was brought in.

 

Cross examined.

 

Q. Was it dark?

 

A. No; the gas-lamp gave sufficient light for me to see them—it is not a foot from the door it is my belief that

they rushed from the house, from the rush that they came from the door — I

lost them both—Rhodes was secured in less than three minutes—I had never

seen him before to my knowledge—I did not run on my bull’s eye, there was

no need—I was within three yards of the door, when they started off—when I

first saw the rush, I was fifteen or not more than twenty yards from it.

 

Mr. Ballantine.

 

Q. Whether you saw them come out of the house or not, are you sure you saw them come from the door?

 

A. Yes; if they were standing at the door, they could not have come with such force as they did—

the lamp enabled me to see very well.

 

Cooper.

 

Q. You say I was crossing towards Leadenhall-Street?

 

A. As you got down to Leadenhall-street the sergeant approached you—you made an at-

tempt to run up towards Aldgate pump, and then you came round again, and

he pursued you—I took notice of you, for I followed, and you had on a dark

brown or green coat; I will not swear exactly to the colour.

 

William Burgess (City-policeman 670).

 

I heard a cry of “Police!” and

took Rhodes—he was concealing himself in a dark gateway—he said, “ What

do you take me for?” -I said, “Wait until the other officer comes up, and you

will see” -he was taken to the station and searched.

 

William Pickering Tregaskis (City police-sergeant, 48).

 

On 7th Dec.,

about a quarter to three o’clock, I was near to Billiter-Street, heard of cry of

“Police!” and ran to the corner of that street—I saw Smith in the act of stop-

ping two men—I observed those two men, but was not hear enough to see

their faces—I saw one of them get away—he made a feint as if to go down

Leadenhall-street towards Aldgate-pump– I ran across thinking to taking him

before he got into Leadenhall-Street, and he made a curve and ran towards

St. Mary Axe into Lime-street—just after he had passed Leadenhall-place, I

observed by the motion of his body that he threw something away, and heard

something—he was stopped by Chambers, and it was the prisoner Cooper—I

went back and searched, with another constable, and he said, just before me,

“Here it is, sergeant”, and picked up a dark lanthorn—it was quite warm-this

jemmy and chisel were given me by a boy—about three o’clock. I went to 5

Billiter-street, and fitted it—there were marks on the desk made by it, and on

the door, and on this piece of wood which I have brought away—the door ap-

pears to have been broken from the outside—if a person had been concealed

in the cupboard, he would have got to the inner door by coming out of the cup-

board, and going up one flight of stairs on to the first-floor—I have been in

the police nine years—oil and lucifers are things persons would use in trans-

actions of this kind—I found neither lucifers or oil on Cooper—Cooper’s cat

was covered with line, so as to give it a light appearance—the cupboard bore

marks of having been rubbed against, and on the paper in the cupboard there

were visible marks of the seats of two persons, and their shoes bore marks of

having been rubbed against, and on the paper in the cupboard there were

visible marks of whitewash—in the morning, I examined about a handful of

dust which had been swept up, and among it I found two matches which ex-

actly corresponded with those I found on Pillips (1) -I have them here—there

were no matches in the house of the kind.

 

Charles Chambers (City policeman, 523).

 

I took Cooper into custody

and found these skeleton keys (produced) in his pocket—they are regular

skeleton keys.

 

Mr. Clarkson submitted that part of the house that was broken, was

not the dwelling-house of either party stated in the indictment, Mr. Mence

having nothing to do with that portion, and no person on behalf of Messrs.

Dodd dwelling there—nor was there any proof of breaking out. Mr. Bal-

lantine contended that it was not necessary to show that the part broken be-

longed to the party dwelling in the house; but that proof of one of the parties

dwelling there was sufficient. The Common Sergeant was of the opinion

that although that might not be proof to support the charge of breaking into

the dwelling-house of Messrs. Dodd, yet as the prisoners were proved to have

broken into the house in which Mr. Mence dwelt, that would be quite suffi-

cient to make the dwelling-house his for this purpose, although the part actu-

ally broken might not be in his occupation.

 

Cooper’s Defence:

 

I was passing down the New Kent-road, when a friend

of mine, or rather a young man asked me to take care of a brown paper par-

cel; he gave it to me. I went on to an ale-house near the Elephant and Castle,

and then undid the paper, and not until then did I know that it contained

these keys; I had an appointment with my brother in Whitechapel-road which

detained me till late, and on my way through Billiter-street, I hear cries of

“Police!” having these keys on me, I certainly ran, fearing if they were found

on me, I should get into trouble; in justice to the other prisoner, I must say,

that until this moment I never saw him.

 

RHODES—Guilty*(2) Aged 24.—Transported for Seven Years.

 

COOPER– Guilty* (2) Aged 22.– Transported for Ten Years.

 

Notes:

 

(1) Who is Phillips?? Possibly and error in the transcription of the trial!

(2) What is the relevance of the asterisk(*) against the verdict. I will need

to check this out.

Note on Husband: Charles George Harvey COOPER (3)

I had heard about the existence of Charles Cooper, No 2779 a long time ago, but it was CGH Cooper's position of Law Clerk to the Attorney General, then following him into private practice as the Senior Law Clerk in the prestigious law firm of the day that complete put me off the track!. Plus the fact that a couple of his sons-in-laws were Justices of the Peace and District Registrars, and William Hellyer Cooper, one of his younger sons, was also a Justice of the Peace (as well as a publican and pastoral station owner in the notoriously hot area of Marble Bar in the northern part of Western Australia.).1

Note on Husband: Charles George Harvey COOPER (4)

Obituary: From "Daily News" Dec: 28. 1886

 

 

From "Daily News" Dec: 28. 1886

 

On Sunday morning the Rev V. Roberts notified in Wesley Church that the evening service would have special reference to the deaths of the late Rev. R.W. Campbell, and Mr. C.G.H. Cooper. The congregation was not so large in the morning as usual, but in the evening, all the pews were filled not only by members of the Wesleyan connexion, but also by those of the other religious denominations in Perth and Femantle. The lessons chosen for the service were John xi, and 1 Cor. xv from v. 35, the hymns Nos. 41, 42 and 50. The choir also sang "Vital Spark of Heavenly Flame." The Rev. V. Roberts, who also preached the funeral sermon, took for the basis of his discourse, 1Cor. Xv 19, "If in this life only we have hope in Christ, we are of all men most miserable." The preacher briefly sketched an outline of Mr. Campbell's life and ministry, and spoke of the loss which the Wesleyan denomination in Australasia had sustained by his decease. He also spoke of Mr. Cooper's long connection with the Society as a prominent member of both church and Sunday school, and his labour in the cause of temperance in the colony. The sermon was very impressive, and was listened to with great interest by the congregation.

 

West Australia Jan 4

Note on Husband: Charles George Harvey COOPER (5)

Obituary [Newspaper unknown]

 

MR. C.G.H. COOPER 26.12.86

 

We regret to have to record the death of the above-named gentleman, which occurred at a quarter to five last Sunday afternoon. The deceased had been suffering from the effects of a cold during the preceding week , but his medical attendant (Dr. Waylen) did not anticipate that any dangerous result would ensue. Congestion of both lungs and liver, however supervened, and Mr. Cooper died at the time mentioned. At one time he occupied an onerous position in the Titles' Department, and for many years acted as chief clerk to Messrs. Stone and Burt. He was President of the Working Men's Institute, and had ever practically proved himself to be a friend of the working man in the truest sense of the term. Fortunately his last hour was soothed by the fact of his having all his family around him to bid them farewell, his eldest daughter, Mrs. O'Grady having arrived in Perth only a day or two before his death. His memory will be cherished by every person with whom he came in contact. The funeral took place on Monday afternoon, under the direction of Mr. Wimbridge, of Hay-street. The service was conducted by the Revs. J. W. Mouland and V. Roberts.

Note on Husband: Charles George Harvey COOPER (6)

Christened at St Mary's, Newington, Surrey, 15 June 1828

Marriage Reg. No. 1491/1860 (Perth, Western Australia)

Death Reg. No. 14384/1886 (Perth, Western Australia)

Buried Plot 169, Wesley Section AA Karrakatta Cemetery

Clerk to the Attorney General (Perth, Western Australia) 1862

Purchased Perth Town Lot in 1864 (Hay Street through to Murray Street) now City Arcade, Perth, WA.

Chief Clerk to Messrs. Stone & Burt, Solicitors, Perth, Western Australia, President of the Working Men's Institute.

Charles is listed in the Free Settlers volume of the Dictionary of Western Australians, so his secret was not known to his children or grandchildren! However in early 2006 when the 1851 Census of England and Wales became available on line, I discovered his hidden past!

He was charged at the Central Criminal Courts, London (Old Bailey) on 17 December 1849 with burglary with breakout, and sentenced to transportation for 10 years. He arrived in Perth Western Australia as Convict No. 2779 on board the "Sea Park" on 5th April 1854. He gained his ticket of leave on arrival in Western Australia, and commenced work as the Clerk to Attorney General two weeks later.1

Note on Husband: Charles George Harvey COOPER (7)

On trial at the Old Bailey - what a way to spend a birthday!

(by Ainslie Sharpe #40)

 

In a previous issue of "Between the Lines" I wrote of my discovery of the hidden past of Charles Cooper, my great grandfather, who had biographical entries in both the Free Settlers and the Bond volumes of the Dictionary of Western Australians.

 

To quickly refresh your memory, after searching through many microfiche of the 1851 census of England & Wales for Charles, I failed to find him in the vicinity of Camberwell, Newington, Peckham where the rest of his family resided. It was only early last year when Ancestry.com released the 1851 Census on their web site that I found my Charles - residing in Portland Prison!! With the help of my cousin (third cousin, once removed - but so close in our love of genealogy!) in London, we obtained copies of court documents and prison registers to prove conclusively that Convict No. 2779, Chas. Cooper, who arrived on the "Sea Park" on 5th April 1854, was also Charles George Harvey Cooper, Clerk to the Attorney General in Perth, and Senior Law Clerk at the legal firm of Stone & Burt.

 

I was very fortunate that my Charles was a Londoner, as among the wonderful resources at WAGS are the films of the transcripts of trials at the Old Bailey post 1830s, from which I was able to obtain proceedings of his trial. The trial took place on 17th December 1849 - his 22nd birthday! It was fascinating reading - the police and witnesses giving evidence, and Charles giving his defence - which to say the very least, was stretching credibility to its limits! In her book, "The Secret River", the winner of the 2006 Commonwealth Writers' prize, Kate Grenville, tells of the arrest and incarceration in Newgate of the main character, William Thornton, pending his trial at the Old Bailey in the early 1800s. She relates "The thing that a man needed in Newgate, more than a loaf of bread and a blanket, was a story. There must always be a story…..no matter how red-handed a man was caught. And a man had to believe it himself, so that when he came to tell it, it felt like God's sworn truth." After reading, Charles' defence statement, I understand while this need for a good story was paramount - he definitely needed a better script writer!

 

Charles was tried along with his accomplice, William Rhodes, who did not give any story in his own defence. Here are portions of the transcript of the trial which has been transcribed from the microfiche copy

of the proceedings of the Central Criminal Courts, London, Second Session, 1849-1850. Pages 200-203.

 

 

213. WILLIAM RHODES and CHARLES COOPER, burglariously breaking and entering the dwelling-house of George Mence, with intent to steal.-2nd Count, for burglariously breaking out of the said dwelling-house-Other Counts, stating it to be the dwelling-house of Thomas Grueber and others.

Mr Ballantine conducted the prosecution.

Thomas Grueber. I am a partner in the firm of Dodd, Grueber and Howsell, solicitors, of 5, Billiter-street-we are the lessees of the house, and underlet the ground-floor to the London General Pension Society-we occupy the first floor, part of the second, and an office at the back of the house. The prisoner Cooper was formerly in our service; I think he came in 1842, and was discharged about twelve months ago-I did not sleep in the house-Mr. Mence, to whom we let the upper part, does-the house is in the parish of St. Catherine Cree-on Thursday, 6th Dec., I left the office at half-past two o'clock-I went again about ten next morning, and was then told that the prisoners were in custody-I examined the premises, and found the door into the clerk's office had been broken open-in the second desk in that office, belonging to one of our confidential clerks, was kept the key of the iron safe and cash-box-the cash-box was kept in the safe-Cooper would know that-I saw marks on the desk which corresponded with a jemmy that was shown me by the police-the other desk was not tried at all-I examined a closet under the stairs, and found a quantity of torn envelopes and papers there- the cupboard was large enough to hold two persons, if they wanted to conceal themselves-there was a little bit of string inside-I examined the staircase, and found that the persons got into the cupboard by putting their feet on a leaden water-pipe which runs along there.

Cross examined by Mr Clarkson. Q. Did you find anything denoting anybody had got into the closet by means of the pipe? A. The pipe bore footmarks-any persons could get into the cupboard without any difficulty from that pipe-it comes nearly flush with the door-the inner door is never open in the day time, unless anybody leaves it open on coming in-the outer one is always open- no one belonging to the firm sleeps in the house-there was no breaking of the outer door- there is no door for Mr. Mence; the same door leads to all the floors- the clerk's office door on the first floor was broken open- after the clerks leave, the housekeeper locks up; she is not here…………………………….

……………

 

John Smith (City-policeman, 611). On Friday morning, 7th Dec., I was on duty in Leadenhall-street, and at a quarter to three heard a cry of "Police!" from 5, Billiter-street-I ran towards the house, and when I came within sight of it, I saw the two prisoners rush out from the door of No. 5-they stood for a few seconds until I crossed near them, and Cooper went to the opposite side-Rhodes stood still-I thought to secure him, and he made a side bounce out of the centre, and they both started off towards Leadenhall-street-there is a gas-light over the house-door-I have not the shadow of a doubt that they are the persons-I tried to catch both, and called "Stop thief?" - I met Sergeant Tregaskis at Leadenhall-Street, and the prisoners were secured-I saw Rhodes taken; I am sure he is the person-I saw Cooper at the station afterwards-I searched Rhodes, and found on him a box of lucifers, a file, a bunch of small keys, a George the Second coin, a little bottle containing oil-I knew Cooper directly he was brought in

……………………………………….

Charles Chambers (City policeman, 523). I took Cooper into custody and found these skeleton keys (produced) in his pocket-they are regular skeleton keys.

Mr. Clarkson submitted that part of the house that was broken, was not the dwelling-house of either party stated in the indictment, Mr. Mence having nothing to do with that portion, and no person on behalf of Messrs. Dodd dwelling there-nor was there any proof of breaking out. Mr. Ballantine contended that it was not necessary to show that the part broken belonged to the party dwelling in the house; but that proof of one of the parties dwelling there was sufficient. The Common Sergeant was of the opinion that although that might not be proof to support the charge of breaking into the dwelling-house of Messrs. Dodd, yet as the prisoners were proved to have broken into the house in which Mr. Mence dwelt, that would be quite sufficient to make the dwelling-house his for this purpose, although the part actually broken might not be in his occupation.

Cooper's Defence: I was passing down the New Kent-road, when a friend of mine, or rather a young man asked me to take care of a brown paper parcel; he gave it to me. I went on to an ale-house near the Elephant and Castle, and then undid the paper, and not until then did I know that it contained these keys; I had an appointment with my brother in Whitechapel-road which detained me till late, and on my way through Billiter-street, I heard cries of "Police!" having these keys on me, I certainly ran, fearing if they were found on me, I should get into trouble; in justice to the other prisoner, I must say, that until this moment I never saw him.

 

RHODES-Guilty Aged 24.-Transported for Seven Years.

COOPER- Guilty Aged 22.- Transported for Ten Years.

Note on Husband: Charles George Harvey COOPER (8)

http://members.iinet.net.au/~perthdps/convicts/con-wa12.html

 

Sea Park - arrived in WA in 1854 SOURCES

 

This 835 ton ship was built at Shields in 1845. It was employed as a convict transport for Western Australia and left London, England on January 1, 1854 bound for the Swan River Colony. She carried the twelfth of 37 shipments of male convicts destined for Western Australia. The voyage took 94 days and the Sea Park arrived in Fremantle on April 5, 1854 with 180 passengers and 304 convicts [Erickson]. Thomas Spedding and Josiah Caldwell were the captain and surgeon respectively.

 

There was one death recorded on the convict shipping and description lists for Theodore Johnson (2923) but other sources indicate he died from pneumonia just after arrival. There were 304 convict numbers assigned for the voyage ranging from (2626 to 2929).

 

Of the 180 passengers mentioned above, 96 were pensioner guards and their families, the number being made up of 30 pensioner guards, 23 wives, 21 sons and 22 daughters. The remaining 84 passengers have not been accounted for but were possibly cabin passengers or regular soldiers.

 

Josiah Caldwell's surgeon's journal for the voyage is preserved in the Public Record Office (PRO) in London. Researchers can view a copy on the Australian Joint Copying Project (AJCP) microfilm reel M711 which is held in most major libraries and archives offices throughout Australia.

 

The following list is an alphabetically sorted list of the names associated with each of the 304 convict numbers assigned to this voyage. The comments field gives alternative names attributed to the various convicts, many of which are not only spelling variations, but alternative names used in later life or in subsequent re-convictions. The age quoted seems to refer to the age of the convict when the passenger list was created.

 

NOTE:

Another list detailing the physical appearance of the convicts has been transcribed for this voyage of the Sea Park. It can be viewed here or by following the links to Physical Description on the list below. Similar lists for the other 42 voyages to Western Australia are being added as time permits.

 

 

Name Christian Name(s) Reg No Term Age-S Trial Place Day Mth Year Criminal Offence Comments

 

 

Cooper Charles 2779 10y 26 Central Criminal Court 17 12 1849 Burglary .... .... .... .... ....

 

 

 

Physical Descriptions of Convicts on the Sea Park, 1854

 

 

Surname Christian Name(s) Reg No Occupation M/S Child Height Hair Eyes Face Complexion Build Reg No Distinguishing Marks

 

 

Cooper Charles 2779 clerk S none 5' 5 1/2" dark brown hazel oval fair slight 2779 None

Note on Wife: Sarah Catherine WALDECK (1) - shared note

According to Ainslie Sharpe, Sarah kept a family newspaper cuttings book - presently in Ainslie's possession.

Note on Wife: Sarah Catherine WALDECK (2)

Newspaper cutting in possession of Ainslie Sharpe.

 

1922

 

AN OCTOGENARIAN'S BIRTHDAY

 

MRS. S. C. COOPER OF CLAREMONT.

 

Today, May 16, Mrs. Sarah Catherine Cooper, of Claremont, celebrates her 85th birthday, surrounded by descendants of three generations.

Her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Waldeck, arrived at Fremantle during the early 'thirties, and associated themselves with the brothers Joseph and John Wall Hardey in the work of founding Methodism in Perth, of which denomination Mr. Waldeck was a prominent lay preacher.

Mrs. Cooper has resided in the State throughout her long, useful, and eventful life, and is a living testimony of what the climate of Western Australia can accomplish on the score of cheerfulness and energy. Her husband, the late Mr. Charles George Henry [sic] Cooper, was managing clerk for Messrs. Stone and Burt up to the time of his death which occurred during the middle 'eighties. Among their numerous family of boys and girls was the late Mr. Thomas Harvey Cooper (affectionately known as "Tombo" to his familiars), of the Lands Department, Mrs. Arthur Hicks of the Williams, and Mrs. Robert O'Grady, at whose home in Claremont-avenue the widely respected octogenarian resides.

Note on Wife: Sarah Catherine WALDECK (3)

Newspaper cutting in possession of Ainslie Sharpe.

 

1923

 

COOPER. - On December 28, suddenly, at her residence, 167 Claremont-ave., Claremont, Sarah Catherine, relict of the late C. G. H. Cooper and mother of Mrs. L. H. O'Grady, Mrs Arthur Hicks, Messrs. W. H. Ashley, Alfred G. and the late Thos. H. Cooper, aged 86 year.

 

Now the labourer's task is o'er.

Note on Wife: Sarah Catherine WALDECK (4)

Newspaper cutting in possession of Ainslie Sharpe.

 

29/12/1923

 

FUNERAL NOTICES.

 

COOPER. - The Friends of the late Mrs. Sarah Catherine Cooper, late of Erinagh, 167 Claremont-avenue, Claremontg, widow of the late Charles George H. Cooper, are respectfully invited to follow her remains to the place of interment, the Methodist portion of the Karrakatta Cemetery. The Funeral is appointed to leave the residence of her daughter, Mrs. L. H. O'Grady, 167 Claremont-avenue, Claremont at 11.40 o'clock THIS (Saturday) MORNING. Friends wishing to attend the Funeral may proceed by the 11.40 o'clock train from Perth and the 11.25 o'clock train from Fremantle.

DONALD J. CHIPPER and SON, Funeral Directors, 844 Hay-street, Perth. Tel. A3232.

Note on Wife: Sarah Catherine WALDECK (5)

Newspaper cutting in possession of Ainslie Sharpe.

 

Daily News 7/1/1924

 

PASSING OF AN OCTOGENARIAN

 

THE LATE MRS. S. C. COOPER.

 

(By "H")

 

By the death of Mrs. Sarah Catherine Cooper, which took place at the residence of her daughter (Mrs. Lucy O'Grady), in Claremont-avenue, a few days ago, the State has lost one of its oldest native born colonists, whose parents (Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Waldeck) landed at Fremantle from London during the early 'thirties,

The late Mrs. Cooper was born in Perth on May 16, 1837, consequently she had attained her 86th year, during the whole of which she had resided in various portions of the State. She was renowned for her thrift, her industry, and her practical common sense. Her parents were associated with the brothers Joseph and John Hardy, in the missionary work of founding Methodism in Perth, and for many years Mr. Waldeck was the superintendent of the Wesleyan Sunday School, which stood upon a portion of the William-street frontage, a portion of which is now occupied by the Economic Stores.

Before her marriage Mrs. Cooper assisted in the drapery establishment of the late Mr. George Shenton, father of Sir George. Her husband, the late Mr. C.G.H. Cooper, for many years held an important position in the Land Titles Department, and at the time of his death, which occurred on Boxing Day, 1866, was managing clerk for the legal firm of Stone and Burt. At that time the Cooper family owned the site fronting Hay and Murray streets, upon which the Strelitz buildings now stand, and which was purchased from Mrs. Cooper by the Citizens' Life Insurance Company (now the Temperance and General) during the early 'nineties, for £8,000. Up to that time Mrs. Cooper controlled an extensive drapery business on the Hay-street frontage that is owned and occupied by Messrs. Barnett Bros., subsequently removing her stock-in-trade to William-street, near the site upon which stands the business of Harry Armstrong Limited. At that time her parents, with many other members of the Waldeck clan, were residents of Greenough, where one of Mrs. Cooper's sisters married Mr. John Stephen Maley, who was a mechanical genius of a very high order, and whose apprenticeship as an engineer and blacksmith was served under the guidance of a clever old colonist named Solomon Cook, whose extensive operations were conducted upon the site that is now occupied by Guilfoyle's Australian Hotel, in Murray-street.

Among Mr. And Mrs. Maley's descendants are the brothers Maley, one of whom is the Minister for Agriculture, while the other is M.L.A. for Irwin, and whose sister (Mrs. Mary [Faybelly?], J.P.) has done so much in the way of popularising the consumption of wheat as a daily diet and curt for many of the ailments that afflict suffering humanity.

Mr. And Mrs. Waldeck, the progenitors of the Cooper-Maley clan, celebrated their golden wedding at their Greenough hospitable home in the year 1885, in the presence of a large number of their family and friends - their descendants comprising seven sons and daughters, 69 grandchildren, and 11 great-grandchildren, their senior descendant being the subject of this notice, who, at the time of her demise, was the oldest native born Western Australian of her sex.

The head of the Waldeck clan died at the family home, Mt. Pleasant, Greenough, during the year 1895, at the age of 88, the cause of death being an accident, owing to the old gentleman having fallen down some steep steps at the homestead. Mr. Waldeck was one of the State's most useful colonists, and possessed no small skill in medicine and surgery, his delight being to keep a stock of drugs and appliances on hand; and these, together with his services were at the disposal of suffering humanity in all weathers, and at all hours. Even at his advanced age, Mr. Waldeck thought nothing of riding, or driving, 30 miles to set a broken limb, or attend to the ailments of a sick person. As a Methodist, good old "Doctor Waldeck" as he was familiarly called, ranked with the late Thomas Farmer, his adopted son, the brothers Hardy, Mr. George Lazenby, and "Honest Frank" Armstrong - men whose good works and far-reaching influence are apparent in our midst to-day.

Among Mr. Waldeck's grandsons was the late Thomas Harvey Cooper, who for so many years was a prominent and urbane official of the Lands Department, affectionately known to his familiars by the soubriquet of "Tombo."

The Waldeck survivors are Mrs. John Frederick Morrell, of Meckering, and Mrs. Locke M'Pherson, of Northampton: the living descendants of Mrs. Cooper being Messrs. William, Ashley and Alfred. Mrs. Lucy O'Grady, of Claremont, and Mrs. Arthur Hicks, of Williams."

Note on Wife: Sarah Catherine WALDECK (6)

Newspaper cutting in possession of Ainslie Sharpe.

 

8/1/1924

 

THE LATE MRS. S. C. COOPER.

 

Another old colonist in the person of Mrs. Sarah Catherine Cooper passed away on December 28 last. Deceased, who was 86 years of age at the time of her death was born in this State, and had resided here most of her life. Her husband, the late Mr. Charles G. H. Cooper, pre-deceased her about six years ago. She leaves a grown-up family of three sons and two daughters to mourn their loss.

The cortege moved from the residence of her daughter (Mrs. L.H.O'Grady, 167 Claremont-avenue, Claremont) on December 31, and proceeded to the Wesleyan portion of the Karrakatta Cemetery, where, in the presence of a very large gathering, the remains were interred.

The chief mourners were: Messrs. William H. and Ashley Cooper (sons), H. D., G. C., and Stan O'Grady, L. Burridge and Master Alan Cooper (grand-sons), Messrs. H. K. Maley, G. E., A. W., and S. F. Morrell (nephews), and Mr. C. Timewell.

The pall-bearers were: Dr. A. J. Wright, H. G. Stirling, J. W. Langsford, W. J. Hammond, A. Gorrie, and T. W. L. Powell.

Amongst those present were: Dr. Tregonning, W. J. Tregonning, J. Ware, E. C. Stott, J. H. Ryce, C. Fuchs, C. J. M'Mullen, H. Palmer, F. W. Keoppe, J. Thompson, M. L. A., E. H. Rosman, A. Perry, H. E. Mofflin, P. Chittleborough, Jim Moore, E. S. Rogers, T. J. Briggs, H. Hammond, L. W. Hattfield, W. G. Chipper, W. R. Jeffrey, G. P. Schooler, G. Hill and others.

Wreaths and floral tributes were received from the following: Mr. And Mrs. A. Forbes, Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Briggs and family, Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Whitfield, Laura Chipper and Miss Williams, Mr. and Mrs. Carter and family, Methodist Ladies' Guild, Claremont, officers and members Methodist Church, Claremont, Mr. and Mrs. A. Leach, Mr. and Mrs. Lynn, Mrs. Craig and Jean, Ada and Charlie, Chris and Gus, Will and Elsie, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Carter and family, m Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Camm and family, Dr. and Mrs. Tregonning, Dr. and Mrs A. J. Wright, Mrs. Parker and daughters, all at Cirencester, Doll and Clarrie, Stanley H. Burridge, Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Rogers, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Chipper, Mrs. E. Hoyle and Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Brisbane, Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Sadleir, Mrs. Sedgeman and family, Mabel and Harry Maley, Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Davis and family, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Langsford and family, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Hammond and family, Mrs. Albert and Mr. and Mrs. Ewens, C. D. and P. E. Curtis, Rev. A. W. Bray, Horace Stirling, and numerous others.

The Rev. E. H. O. Nye, assisted by the Revs. A. J. Barclay and A. W. Bray officiated at the graveside, and the funeral arrangements were carried out by Messrs. Donald J. Chipper and Son."

Note on Wife: Sarah Catherine WALDECK (7)

Newspaper cutting in possession of Ainslie Sharpe.

 

Western Australian 8/1/1924

 

Mrs S. G. Cooper [sic]

 

Mrs S. G. Cooper [sic], relict of the late Mr. C. G. H. Cooper, who died suddenly at Claremont, on December 28, was a very old colonist. She was born in Perth on May 10, 1837, and was, therefore, in her 87th year. Her father, the late Mr. Frederick Waldeck arrived at Fremantle on the Parmella in the early thirties and after a few years residence in Perth, took up land on the Greenough flats. The only surviving members of the family are two sisters, Mrs. John F. Morrell, now of Meckering, and Mrs. Locke Macpherson, of Northampton. There will be many who will remember the business carried on by the late Mrs. Cooper on the spot adjoining Strelitz-lane in Hay-street, and relinquished by her in 1891. Her remains were buried in the Methodist portion of Karrakatta Cemetery, the Revs. E. H. O. Nye, A. Barclay and A. W. Bray, taking part in the service. The chief mourners at the graveside were Messrs. William H. and Ashley Cooper (sons), Messrs. H. D., G. C., and S. DeC. O'Grady, Alan Cooper, and L. J. Burridge (grandsons), Messrs. G. E., A. W. and S. F. Morrell and H. K. Maley, M.L.A., (nephews), and Mr. Clarence Timewell. The pall-bearers were Dr. A. J. Wright, Messrs. J. W. Langsford, A. Gorrie, W. J. Hammond, H. G. Stirling and T. W. L. Powell. A memorial serice was conducted on Sunday evening last at the Claremont Methodist Church by the Rev. E. H. O. Nye and was well attended.

Note on Wife: Sarah Catherine WALDECK (8)

1st Child registered under new system in Western Australia

 

Buried Karrakatta Cemetery Wesleyan Section AA Plot No 0169 with husband.

Sources

1Ainslie Sharpe, "|nformation supplied by Ainslie Sharpe".
Text From Source: |nformation supplied by Ainslie Sharpe (descendant of Charles George Harvey Cooper) of
Graham Hoadly.
2St Peter's Church, Walworth, Surrey, Parish Register.
Text From Source: St Peter,s Church, Walworth, Surrey, Parish Register, GLRO
London Metropolitan Archives, 40 Northampton Road, London, EC1R 0HB. Tel: 020 7332 3820.
3"Baptism Newington, Surrey 15 Jun 1828 Charles George Harvey COOPER" (294).
Text From Source: Baptism
Reference: 294
Date: 15 Jun 1828
Address: St Mary Newington, Southwark, Surrey
Place: Newington, Surrey
Name: Charles George Harvey COOPER
Gender: male
Age:
Date of Birth: 17 Dec 1827
Birth place: Newington, Surrey
Birth address: Seymour Place, Newington, Surrey
Residence place: Seymour Place, Newington, Surrey
Residence address: Seymour Place, Newington, Surrey
Father: Frederick Hellyar COOPER
Father's Occupation: Coal Merchant
Father's residence place: Newington, Surrey
Father's residence address: Seymour Place, Newington, Surrey
Mother: Lucy Harrison HARVEY
Mother's Occupation:
Mother's residence place: Newington, Surrey
Mother's residence address: Seymour Place, Newington, Surrey
Minister: Rev. Chas. Wray Haddlesey
picture

Source: Baptism Newington, Surrey 15 Jun 1828 Charles George Harvey COOPER, Frederick Hellyar & Charles George Harvey Cooper 1828 3

4"Census 1841 (Frederick Cooper) Camberwell, Surrey HO107/1050/5/6/5".
Text From Source: Frederick Cooper 40 Vestry Clerk No
Lucy Cooper 40 No
Charlotte Cooper 20 No
Frederick Cooper 15 No
Charles Cooper 14 Yes
Sarah Cooper 12 Yes
Sidney Cooper 8 Yes
Thomas Cooper 14months Yes
Assessment: Primary evidence.
picture

Source: Census 1841 (Frederick Cooper) Camberwell, Surrey HO107/1050/5/6/5, Frederick Cooper 41

5"Census 1851 (Charles George Cooper) Portland, Dorset HO107/1857/618/36".
Text From Source: Chas. Cooper Prisoner Unm 23 Clerk Surrey Walworth
Assessment: Primary evidence.
picture

Source: Census 1851 (Charles George Cooper) Portland, Dorset HO107/1857/618/36, Charles George Cooper 51

6Death Certificate.
Text From Source: GRO death certificate
In possession of Graham Hoadly.
Assessment: Primary evidence.
Text From Source: DUPLICATE REGISTER OF DEATH 14384

No: 3538
When and where died: 26th December 1886
Name and Surname: Charles George Harvey Cooper
Sex: M
Age: 59 years
Occupation: Law Clerk
Cause of Death: Pneumonia (Certified by Dr Warples [?])
Signature, description and residence of informant: W.J. Windridge Undertaker Perth
When registered: 28th December 1886
Signature of Registrar: David [?] Ross
Family Records Centre, 1 Myddleton Street, LONDON, EC1R 1UW. Tel: 020 8392 5300.
picture

Source: Death Certificate, 17 Rosefield Street, Leamington June 2014 (4)

7Ainslie Sharpe, "|nformation supplied by Ainslie Sharpe".
Text From Source: |nformation supplied by Ainslie Sharpe (descendant of Charles George Harvey Cooper) of
Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: Frederick G Waldeck was born 3/11/1807 in Germany, died 14/8/1895 at
Greenough, Western Australia. Fredericka Kniest was born 17/6/1812 in
Germany, died 9/8/1905 also at Greenough, Western Australia. Sarah
Catherine Waldeck was born on 16/5/1837 in Perth, WA.
Graham Hoadly.