See also

Family of James George TRINGHAM and Marian Maud STILL

Husband: James George TRINGHAM (1880-1940)
Wife: Marian Maud STILL (1881-1980)
Children: James Usborne Still TRINGHAM (1908-1914)
Marion Eleanor TRINGHAM (1912-2005)
Theodora Margaret TRINGHAM (1914-2001)
Marriage 26 Sep 1906 Charlton, Kent1
St Paul's Church, Charlton

Husband: James George TRINGHAM

picture

James George TRINGHAM

picture

James George TRINGHAM

picture

James George TRINGHAM

picture

James George TRINGHAM

picture

James George TRINGHAM

picture

James George TRINGHAM

Name: James George TRINGHAM
Sex: Male
Father: James George TRINGHAM (1846-1908)
Mother: Sarah Ann PORTER (1847-1889)
Birth 26 Aug 1880 Liverpool, Lancs.2
Death 1940 (age 59-60)

Wife: Marian Maud STILL

picture

Marian Maud STILL

picture

Marian Maud STILL

picture

Marian Maud STILL

picture

Marian Maud STILL

picture

Marian Maud STILL

picture

Marian Maud STILL

Name: Marian Maud STILL3
Sex: Female
Father: David Usborne STILL (bef1846-1932)
Mother: Ellen Agnes KIMPTON (1849-1931)
Birth 29 Jun 1881 Woolwich, Kent3,4,5
42 Chapel Street, Woolwich, Kent
Christening 6 Nov 1881 (age 0) Woolwich, Kent6
Saint Mary Magdalene, Woolwich
Census 5 Apr 1891 (age 9) Woolwich, Kent3
36 Church Street, Woolwich, Kent
Census 31 Mar 1901 (age 19) Woolwich, Kent7
36 Church Street
Occupation 31 Mar 1901 (age 19) School Teacher; Woolwich, Kent7
Death 1980 (age 98-99)

Child 1: James Usborne Still TRINGHAM

Name: James Usborne Still TRINGHAM
Sex: Male
Birth 3 Apr 1908 Camberwell, Surrey8,9
Death 16 Sep 1914 (age 6) Birkenhead9,10
Bible: "Aged 6 years and 5 months"
Burial 19 Sep 19149

Child 3: Marion Eleanor TRINGHAM

picture

Marion Eleanor TRINGHAM

Name: Marion Eleanor TRINGHAM
Sex: Female
Birth 7 Apr 19129
Death 2005 (age 92-93)

Child 4: Theodora Margaret TRINGHAM

picture

Theodora Margaret TRINGHAM, 1926, age 12

Name: Theodora Margaret TRINGHAM
Sex: Female
Spouse: H.B. MILLER ( -1982)
Birth 19 Sep 1914 Birkenhead11,12
Death Apr 2001 (age 86) Hereford, Herefordshire11

Note on Wife: Marian Maud STILL (1)

The first shop my father took was at Woolwich - 42 Chapel Street which ran straight up from the main Dockyard Gate. It had been a doctors surgery - and was quite small in all ways. Here in 1881 on the 29th of June while the thermometer stood at 91* in the shade - I your Mother was born. My Mother grieved I should be born in so humble a dwelling but she had not had so good a nurse before - nor so good a Doctor nor so good a baby. The doctors name was Stewart & the nurse a Mrs. Tucker. I was christened at St Mary's Parish Church & my Aunt Sophy was my Godmother. Sixteen years later I was to be confirmed in the same Church.

 

When I was about two & a half years old we moved to a larger shop & house 37 Church Street not far away. At this time my parents were 38 and 34 years old - still young, and my two sisters Nelsie & Dora were about nine and seven years old.

 

Church Street was a very busy street - all the traffic from Gravesend came through on its way up to London It was very narrow with tram-cars running on their lines with horses & bells. The pavement was narrow & the foot traffic heavy, workmen going to the Arsenal or the Dockyard or people going into the town center. The shops were only one side of the street. A very high old brown brick wall ran the whole length - the Dockyard wall built very high to keep in the convicts working there in days gone by. From our bed-room window we could not see over this wall but had to go to the top of the house where we could see a fine view of the river Thames and all the ships and red sailed barges passing up and down.

 

We called this upstairs room 'the sky parlour' & we used to play up there. One thing we were very fond of doing was to draw the ships as they passed by - large scrap books we had for this. A two funnelled steamer was eagerly drawn - we put in everything we had time for. One day we had a prize indeed for a large four funnelled ship "The City of Rome" went by. We could not always see the names - Red sailed barges were very common. We painted them all with the right colours if possible. This "sky parlour was in later years to be your Father's bed-room - for the three or four months he was with us.

 

The house was very old. The shop had been built out in 1819. before that it was a private house. It was pulled down in 1949. Church Street was much older than what we called "the town" which lay the other side of St Mary's churchyard. There were many good old established shops there, the businesses passing from father to son. And of course they all lived over their shops. There was a good trade to be done among working class folk. On one side of us was Littlewood the Watchmaker - & on the other side Champion's the cornchandlers & post office. Champions was a much bigger & newer place than ours - with its hay barns & stables & waggons & great open brick places full of steaming manure. Their garden was behind all this and quite large. We all played a lot in this garden with Ethel the youngest girl - also up in the hay lofts at "follow the leader" - Ethel, my sister Dora and I.

 

There were great cellars under our house. One side for coal - we had a year's supply in at a time - & the other side for drugs all cobweby & pitch dark. There were rats too at times. I remember one of our young men assistants refusing to go down. The descent was by a ship's ladder - nothing to hold on to.

 

We were on the hill & the horses all struggled up with their loads. The trams had a third horse hooked on at the bottom of the hill with a boy riding it & the three horses nearly "strained their guts out" people said getting to the top. The noise was great & constant from three in the morning with the market garden carts going by until midnight. when the public houses closed. There were a great number of these in Church St. and drunken men & women quite common. The narrow road was often muddy & of course there was the horse manure - A cart with a long revolving brush was constantly up & down sweeping all to one side which was collected later. Also the watering cart allayed the dust. We went up two steps into our shop & then entered a glass enclosure with door & a bell which tinkled at the opening of the door. There was no side door. We were jammed in between Littlewoods and Champions. A heavy door divided the shop from the house and another step. We then entered into a long dark passage. Immediately on the right were the stairs panelled in dark wood & winding round. Next came the cellar door - then my Father's coats [?]. And then the Parlour door. All these on the right hand side. We now reached another very heavy door with a bar of iron though it was never closed. It must at one time have been a back-door. But now it lead into "the stone passage" - where was a coal stand in mahogany for our school things & on the other side a pantry cupboard also table for all the lamps to stand. From the stone passage the house was of one storey only & consisted of three small rooms running one into the other. The first was the drug room, then the kitchen & the scullery. All three looked onto Littlewood's trees which overhung the 6ft wall between the houses. These were lilac & laburnum & a large sycamore tree & in the spring time the blossom was very pretty. But my Mother longed for light & air & so some overhanging branches of the tall tree were cut off. And the ceiling of the drug-room was knocked up & boarded like a Church roof. Later it no longer contained drugs & my Mother's good books were displayed on the wide shelves & looked very handsome. We had all our meals in this room. With occasional tea in the parlour. My Mother & I by the fire there.

 

In the kitchen we had our Saturday bath - there was a large dresser & some dark cupboards. The scullery had a real copper copper where my Father made the jam every year. And here at last is a door which opens into the air. Under the brown sink the leeches are kept. And over the sink is the only tap in the house - later water was laid on in the shop. Outside the scullery door the garden was paved, the narrow stretch between the windows & the wall right round to the small W.C. From the scullery was a step, & another step from the paved part to the garden proper.

 

A word about the parlour - our modest little sitting-room. French doors opened into the "green house". It was my Father's pride & he kept it bright with flowers & ferns - scarlet & pink geraniums & beautiful maiden hair ferns petunias & zin An indiarubber tree rose to the roof & a spreading palm did very well. Its crowning glory was the grapevine which covered the whole roof - a flat roof in the early days - the floor was of red-brick. All these flowers & ferns & greenery were constantly watered with a brass syringe so it always looked bright & fresh. The outer door opened into the paved garden.

 

The parlour's only light & air came through the green-house. It was all panelled, but canvas had been stretched across & papered. This probably made it lighter. There was a piano here & a Persia carpet on the floor - a sofa & some pretty little chairs. All the fireplaces in the house were of the small pattern made of two semicircles the top part held the fire & the lower formed a stand - all had good hobs & a wide open chimney without bends. There was the usual very deep cupboard at the side of the fireplace. Up the dark panelled stairs were two bed-rooms one front & one back taking the width of the house. These two rooms were the best in the house. We three children slept in the front room which looked on to the dockyard wall. The very deep cupboard was a ward-robe we could walk into & took all our clothes & had a glass door. I slept in a large double bed with my sister Nelsie & Dora had a single bed at the side. We all went to bed at the same time. 9.30 p.m. I was never put to bed alone. We had a brass candlestick & after getting into bed we would all chant out "Please come up & blow out our light & bring us up a chocky tablet" - then our mother came up, & say Goodnight. After that my two sisters always started "Our game". A tale that went on for years - each adding a piece till we all fell asleep. The one thing we never forgot every night was to kneel beside the bed & say our prayers. The other bed-room overlooking the garden & all the gardens up a side street was our parents'. Upstairs again were two more bedrooms - smaller because each had a whole slice taken off which formed a cupboard with its own separate door from the landing - a small dark room really. There were deep cupboards too in both rooms & a huge one over the stairs. Our father kept his drugs in these cupboards & bales of sponges etc.

 

In the back bedroom over looking the garden Nelsie & I slept for sometime. In fact years before Nelsie wanted a bedroom to herself & this top back room was got ready for her. I remember Mama staining the surround & dabbing it all over with a sponge dipped in enamel. Nelsie took all her things up there & went to bed. In the middle of the night she came down again, she was too nervous to stay there. No further attempt was made by any of us to sleep alone. Of course there were shutters to the shop which Papa took down every morning at nine o'clock except on Sunday when the shop remained pitch dark. Unless the gas was lit. There was no gas in the house only oil lamps & candles. Every Sunday morning we went to Church without fail, except Mama who cooked the dinner. Somehow she "had lost her religion", a great grief "worse than losing the children". Anyhow she never ever came with us to Church.

 

Invariably we were late. It was a long way to Holy Trinity Church Charlton all along by the dockyard & wall & the tram lines. After the service Papa went across the road to his little branch shop & cashed up the weeks takings. The caretaker was a Mrs. England or a Mrs. Power who could be relied on to give help at home in any illness or emergency. Coming home from church at our leisure we always took the top way & came through Hanging Wood Lane. Here in the summer the trees met overhead & it was delightful. I remember running through this lane Dora & I with Mama & Nelsie walking sedately behind, on the afternoon that Nelsie & Dora were confirmed at St. Paul's Church Charlton. Many years later I was to be married in the same Church.

 

In the early years our back garden was quite pretty. Either side against the high dark walls were trained two large fruit trees - pears which blossomed every spring. Papa worked in it & we each had our strip & grew musk & double daisies & pansies & "Old Man". Over the back fence was a huge mulberry tree - quite handsome, to be seen from our bed-room windows. We were very friendly with Ethel Champion next door & spent a lot of time in there playing in the hay loft & in the old cabin as we called it in the garden. The Champions had an old man working around the place "Old Bill" he was called & my earliest recollection is singing to him "Tommy Make Room For Your Uncle". When he saw me he would raise his hand up & down & I would start to sing - always the same song.13

Note on Wife: Marian Maud STILL (2)

About this time a great change came in our lives. Papa took a new branch shop at Clacton-on-Sea. He took this step in an attempt to get us all away from Church Street to a healthier place. Mama's health was very poor indeed by now but she still had her three girls. It was a brave effort, & took us all away by the sea to live there in a fine new house & shop for about two years. The second season was a failure because the boats from London stopped running & in any case there was only a six weeks season. At this time 1885 - 1886 Clacton was only a very small place indeed. Our back garden backed on to fields. Our address was "Delane House" North Avenue. The shop was beautifully fitted up with mahogany & cut glass. The glory of the house was the crystal cut-glass hanging chandelier in the drawing room over the shop. There was a fine bathroom too. Papa did not come with us he stayed behind to look after the Woolwich shops. A young assistant Mr. Herbert Bailey aged nineteen was to look after the shop. A very amiable young man we all liked. I used to ride on his shoulders into the confectioners shop near-by where he was courting the proprietor's sister. He was in fact already married though we did not know it.

 

We were all intent on being happy there. In the summer our friends & relations came down to stay with us. Ethel Champion stayed all the summer. We had an indoor maid Annie Cunningham. We bathed in the sea & had fine picnics on the cliffs. Nelsie and Dora often tried a tricycle for 6d an hour but no more was charged however long they had them. I had my first little friend, called Gertie Hatch. Nelsie & Dora had many friends - the people were very friendly for out of the season they had plenty of leisure. We all went to a little private school but later a Wesleyan School was opened & we all went to that. A Mr. Brown was headmaster who believed in getting the children to sing. We never forgot those songs. I sometimes now sing them to my Grandchildren "A Fisher Boy am I" & "Oh my Heart is sore with Sighing" etc. One of the teachers a Miss Haslam came to Mama for French lessons. Some times Papa came down. Once or twice he sang in the local concert "It's forty years my Old Friend John". Dora recited " The Charge of the Light Brigade" whilst Nelsie sang a duet "No Sir" with Kate Briggs. Of course we all went to Church - a Mr. Haines was the Rector. Mr. Bailey was very fervent - he was a Wesleyan. Later he was to have a shop of his own at Portsmouth & settle down with his wife - but he was with us all the time we were at Clacton. I used to have a letter he wrote to me after he left beginning "My dear little Marion - do you still play Bo-peep on the stairs". Nelsie did not like him so much for he once boxed her ears ! I do not know why nor what Mama did about it. Annie Cunningham was always saying to us "Oh Pray together don't" - so I fear we were often a nuisance. Once when she said this we all knelt down on the floor. The winters were very cold. Great icicles hung in a fringe round the kitchen window. Church St. house was much warmer. I remember walking out along the sea-wall with Mama in the biting east wind. Annie Cunningham & Nelsie used to get up early & made dripping toast by the kitchen fire while Dora & I dressed ourselves under the table. Summer came again & there were Services on the sands every Sunday & we all used to go to these. The year of the Jubilee every child got two quite good books "The Queen's Resolve" & a New Testament. There was a wonderful procession through the town, we were all in it. Mama said there was only one person to look on & that was herself.

 

But now when Papa came down from Woolwich there was a cloud over things. The business was not prospering. Perhaps Mr. Bailey was too light hearted, whatever it was there no money to pay the rent which was heavy. We were obliged to leave. I shall never forget it - Poor Mama was overwhelmed or wornout with the packing up. We all went next door to a friendly soul A Miss Beard & Mama lay in a darkened room unable to get up for a day or so. So we all left our bright sea-side home & returned to Woolwich by boat. We had our cat "Spot" with us. I was only about six years old by now but I remember the dismal return home. The people were still in the house - the lodgers, really Papa must have been to blame. But then he was very, very short of money. Well there it was. We children slept in the garden with the lodger's children. At last we had the place to ourselves & it was all cleaned down & life went on as usual. We said good-bye to Mr. Bailey.

 

A fine new school had opened at Wood Street & we all went there & Clacton-on-Sea was a thing of the past. Money I know was to be very scarce for a long time. Mama made all our clothes &her own too. She also served a lot in the shop. We no longer had a maid to help with the work, only a charwoman about once a week. The washing all went out to be sure but there must have been an awful amount of work. We girls did not do much. Nelsie laid the dinner table, Dora washed up the tea things & I swept up the crumbs. On Saturdays we were supposed to do out our bed-room. But brightness returned to us all again. Mama always sang at her work. Then she started writing to the papers. Letters to begin with, which got published in the local papers. Then articles - sometimes she got 10/- for these. And once she had £5 for a long tale. "Sala's Journal" a weekly periodical published some of her articles. No doubt had she been able to devote herself to writing she could have made her mark. She was a good reader & well versed in the poets. She had fire & life & imagination & was distinguished in appearance. My sisters used to wish they were like "Mama". Papa had an underlying streak of melancholy. Fortunately he had to work so hard he never had time to dwell upon it. My Mother would liken herself to "a race horse tied to a feather-bed". - stuffed full of misery" - her motto was "Do the next thing" - also for us children "Do what you ought come what may."13

Note on Wife: Marian Maud STILL (3)

About now I said 'Goodbye' toJulia Barton. She moved away & I did not see her until nearly twenty years later. I happened to be sitting with my Mother in the dining room upstairs at 9, The Village about 9 o'clock at night when the assistant came up from the shop & said "A young lady to see you Mrs. Still" - And in walked a very fine young woman - tall & stout & fair - it was Julia! She was just off to Madagas [Madagascar ?] to be married. To go back. Jossie had a sister Alice just my age & we were to be very friendly for some years. Then there was Bernherd - the brother, with no music in him. Nelsie & I always liked going to tea there very much. Mr. Jacobson was a gentle Swede.

 

I now went to Miss Lacey's school where Nelsie taught. I was eleven when is [this ?] change was made. The Bank Managers of the town sent their daughters there & the better class tradespeople too. The school was a large old fashioned rambling house in Brewers St. with a very large garden. Nelsie taught the little ones. We all put on pinafores & changed our shoes. There was a visiting Latin Master - visiting French teacher & one for Mathematics. I was at the school four years & found it quite easy to be always top of the class. We took no handiwork not even needlework. Miss Lacey would not undertake to teach me music because she already had too many to teach. Mama did not pay for me at this school. Nelsie outset the fees by her teaching. I think she received about 3/- per week. Every morning we started out together passing by the grocers at the corner where the Miss McLaughlins kept shop. "What a beautiful face your sister has, we always watch for her" said the elder sister to me. After tea we often walked on the Common together.

Note on Wife: Marian Maud STILL (4)

A new park was now opened Maryon Park Charlton. Tennis courts were marked out but players had to provide their own nets & balls. This Nelsie did & she started a tennis club. Most of her friends joined - Jossie & Bernherd, Jessie & two of her brothers Frank & George. Alice & I went too but were not so much good being only about fourteen years old. Jessie played well & her brothers played like experts. Ethel Champion also joined We had seen very little of her for years now though neighbours it was very easy to be unaware of each others existence in houses like ours. She had been one of the prettiest of girls with blue eyes & hair curling round her shoulders - Now she was just a nice looking girl. After a season of tennis I never saw her again. She was later to marry Percy Sanders to our great surprise. Earlier on the eldest of the Champion girls had married & gone away to live in Liverpool. Lizzie Champion, & she had died of consumption shortly afterwards. I little thought then I too might marry & go & live up there. They were a fine handsome family & well educated but consumption attacked them nearly all. Old Mr. Champion & Papa were to quarrel so often that any friendship between the families was difficult. They were all so much older than I was - even Ethel. But Mama & Mrs. Champion were always good friends. She was a strong type of woman - a farmer's daughter - full of what we call horse-sense. She was to outlive nearly all her children, & towards the end of her life she lived in a new modern house built in Mulgrave Place with her grand-daughter - Lizzie's child born in Liverpool & now grown up. Years later after my parents & I had moved to The Village Old Charlton, my Mother & I were leisurely taking a walk as was our custom then when we met Mrs. Champion walking alone. She was much older but still comely with her somewhat rugged features. Mama's face was very finely chiselled by comparison. We were very pleased to see her once again.

Note on Wife: Marian Maud STILL (5)

I had always wanted to go to the "Centre" like Nelsie had done & I sent my name in when I was fifteen. There was an Entrance Examination which I passed. Then the great day came for me to attend the "Centre" as a student. I remember how gaily I ran through the town on my way there. How fine to be going at last to this wonderful place ! My quiet days at Miss Lacey's with Nelsie were over - four years we had been there together. The "Centre" was so very different - I think I was more at home there & I found the girls more friendly. We were expected to study hard & do three hours homework every night. I was up against very clever girls & a few boys. I was never again at the top, like I was at Miss Lacey's. Mr. Garlick the Head Master had not forgotten Nelsie & asked after her. We were only at the Centre for half-the-day - the other half was spent in teaching & I was sent to Mulgrave Place Infants School - there were days when I was happy there but for the most part I was very glad to run home. The Head Mistress told me she "thought I had been spoilt at home" which was very likely. Now it was at this school I was to meet Auntie Ethel. She was just ahead of me - two years. Later she told me how unhappy she had been at this school I wish I had known at the time. It would have been a consolation to me. I think she was much more conscientious than I was & waited more on Miss Thompson than I did - helping her on with her black coat & things like that which I should never had thought of doing - then. I was to remain here & at the 'Centre' nearly five years - if not quite. College loomed ahead & I feared to leave my Mother. I could not bear the thought of it. Two years away from her - what would she do with out me so I gave six months notice to leave & sat for the Civil Service - Woman Clerk - 400 sat for 20 places & though I reached the standard required I did not get in. I was 98. Many of the girls had matriculated. I think in these 'Centre' days I had quite a strenuous life. The walk to 'Centre' at Maxey Road Plumstead took over half-an-hour. Then Mulgrave Place about 15minutres. The teaching & the learning & the homework. Afternoon hours at the 'Centre' were from 2 - 5p.m. on Monday 5.30 p.m. I remember how I used to fling my books down in the 'stone place' & my clothes, & go into the little parlour where Mama was sure to be quietly having tea. How much the dark old house was home. I was always glad to get in & never wanted to leave it.

 

After leaving Miss Lacey's School & before I started at the 'Centre' Nelsie & I had our last holiday together.

Note on Wife: Marian Maud STILL (6)

After leaving Miss Lacey's School & before I started at the 'Centre' Nelsie & I had our last holiday together. We went & stayed with Uncle George & Aunt Jenny at their farm in the Isle of Sheppy. It was my second visit there as I had spent a holiday there with Dora in 1892 while Mama & Nelsie went to Ostend. We enjoyed this with all our Cousins - Edie & Louie Reginald & Stanley. Stewart & Madge - the others - George Winnie & Alec. were in S. Africa by then. There seemed so much to eat there & so many round the table. Uncle George was very genial & Aunt Jenny very kind. But we had been a little disappointed not to sleep together. Nelsie shared Edie's room & I was with Louie & Madge. Madge & I went everywhere together. A farmhouse by the sea was wonderful for a town child. Years afterwards I was to see a lot of Madge for she came to live with us while she was at Munt & Brown, Wood St. E.C. but later she was to live at Canonbury. Mama came to fetch us home. We were so glad to see her both of us. * Then back to school we both went. I to the Centre & Nelsie to Miss Lacey's. [ * note in margin states 1896.] With my first months pay 12/- [again, 1896.] I bought my Mother a novel called "Donovan" by Edna Lyall - 4/6. & my sister some wide satin ribbon. red & pink. It was rather fashionable on hats then. I was so pleased to buy these things. It seemed as though we had years of quiet life ahead of us with me at the 'Centre' & Nelsie at Miss Lacey's & money matters more easy for our Parents.

Note on Wife: Marian Maud STILL (7)

Another change was we were to see much more of the Walter Bishops. My Mother & I now went away together in the summer & Cousin Ernest nearly always came too. To sea-side places. Weymouth, Bournemouth, Ryde, Shanklin, Ostend, Herne Bay & Ramsgate several times with Aunt Ethel & Gladys. (At Herne Bay I remember my Fiance came too, that was your Father.) The shop with all its life & talk & the young men who were my Father's assistants helped to brighten our lives without doubt - for my Mother was always a great talker and Papa was too. Another change was, we left the church at Charlton. Mr. Long had gone to Essex & Papa did not like his successor Mr. Evans. And so he & I now went to St. Mary's, Woolwich only just up the hill. He was sidesman here for many years. When I was sixteen I was confirmed at St. Mary's Church by the Bishop of Rochester together with my friends Jossie & Alice Jacobson and Emily & Maud Carpenter. Emily was to become Mrs. Crawford & we were to know her on & off for a very long while. The Rev. Charles Escreet took these classes - the Rector - Canon Escreet. It was a large class & quite uproarious at times so that he had to say quite often "A little less noise please". His own daughter was in the class & I used to wonder what she thought of it all. Mrs. Jacobson had a visiting dress-maker to make her daughter's dresses for the confirmation & she made mine too - my first white frock. It was dyed red later on. I fear I thought more of my dress than of the service.13

Note on Wife: Marian Maud STILL (8)

At about seventeen Papa brought me a bicycle. Then he & I often cycled out on a Sunday afternoon sometimes to see Grandma at Sydenham or Aunt Nellie at Woodford. We never really used to be very nervous about my riding. Then I used to cycle out with Miss Cummins whose Mother kept a little draper's shop a few doors off. She sang the solos at St. Peters R.C. Church in the town. I had some lessons from her in singing & the piano too. I took up the mandoline & had lessons somewhere over Plumstead Common. But I had not the music in me that Nelsie had had. Still what I had came in very useful later on.13

Note on Wife: Marian Maud STILL (9)

My cousin Madge Still from the Isle of Sheppey came & stayed with me while Mama was away. She was then about sixteen, pretty with fair hair & blue eyes, a crisp & dainty little thing. As I was away teaching or at the Centre all day I don't know what she did but she seemed quite happy. There must have been someone there to look after us all. What I most remember is that every evening except (Saturday) Sunday not only Bernherd came but Harold Bishop, now very gone on Madge. They both stayed to supper & still stayed on. Madge would bring in the clock & wind up the alarm, and still they stayed. Every evening it was the same. We laughed a lot about them. We all three went to see Mama at Worthing. Papa - now called "Parent" Madge & I - we went for the day. And of course nearly lost the train at Woolwich. We got out at Deptford & had to run all the way to the New Cross Station L.B.&S. Coast. Madge could scarcely do it. We just caught the Worthing train luckyly. Mama was staying at a pleasant boarding house in the Steyne. Kept by the Misses Peck - very genteel ladies. taking only two's in shoes. Cousin Ernest also stayed there while Mama was getting better. Very courageous of him as he was the only man, & a shy one too.13

Note on Wife: Marian Maud STILL (10)

By the time the Boer War came I had left the teaching. The town was very busy. The Arsenal working full strength at overtime & soldiers everywhere. They used to embark from the Royal Albert Docks North Woolwich & would pass by our shop on the way. Women & children clinging to the soldiers as they marched in the ranks. There was so much drinking going on that orders were given for the soldiers to embark by night. Sir Charles Bulyer himself was stated to have been very intoxicated. And so we were awakened of a night by a chorus of whistling - "The Cock of the North" - as the soldiers tramped by in the dark. They were not allowed the band that had always played by day as they marched along. This marching by night was quite easy. Jessie Forrest & I used to go across to the Albert Docks to see the wounded soldiers come home again. Our pride in the "English" soldiers was very great - we thought them invincible - and Lord Roberts and Colonel Baden Powell, & Hector Macdonald & Lord Kitchener what heroes they were. But Grandma was a Pro-Boer ! We thought as soon as Lord Roberts landed in South Africa the War would soon be over. We were surprised at how long it lasted. But Woolwich always prospered in War Time. I had seen tired soldiers come home from other wars - The Ashanti Wars & the Afghan War all very brown & thin occasionally carrying a parrot in a cage. But the Boer War was different - it was mixed up in our lives - we followed its course. The most popular song was Rudyard Kipling's

"When you've shouted Rule Brittania

When you've sung God Save the Queen

When you've finished killing Kruger with your mouth

Will you kindly drop a shilling in this little tambourine ……… "

 

It was sung everywhere. I heard the 'buskers' at night singing it into the public house a few doors away. Another song was

 

"The Boers have got my Daddy

my soldier dad

I don't like to see my Mummy cry

I don't like to see my Mummy sigh ……… "

 

After this came a most stunning blow to all the nation - almost as if the sun had dropped out of the sky - "The death of Queen Victoria" - I rushed with the news into Cummins the Draper - We could not believe it true. No body had known another Queen - only Grandma. We all went into mourning. St. Mary's Church was packed out for a memorial service. I was squeezed up in the gallery with Jessie. How very, very strange to sing "God save our gracious King" - ! Several things changed now. My friend Jessie took up nursing at St. Olave's Hospital Rotherhythe - & I left the "Centre" & was now at home all day - helping Mama. I went to Jossie Jacobson's wedding to Mr. Wightman at St. John's Blackheath. I nearly cried at this wedding. I felt so sad. The Bride's people were all on one side of the Church & the Bridegroom's on the other - but he had so few - & he himself sat alone in the choir stalls waiting so quietly - sad too I thought. I would like to have sat with him but of course could not. We had been so fond of him - my sister Nelsie & Mama, & I even used to count the days since I had last seen him. But it was a long time now since he had sung in his rich bass voice "The Holy City" & "The Star of Bethlehem" in our little parlour. A long time since he had seen my sister home for the last time.

 

He & Jossie went to live in Bedford & we only saw them occasionally as the long years went by.

 

I did not see Miss Lacey again for 35 years. We were living at Sidcup - Daddy & I; & I was walking over Woolwich Common to visit Charlton Cemetery when I passed her school - now moved from Brewers St. to the Common & a sudden thought came to me "shall I see if she is still there" And so I knocked. A child opened the door & Miss Lacey came looking just the same as she always did ! In the course of a short conversation I said to her "My sister was very clever" to which she replied "She was very brave" "Your Mother was a most remarkable woman. & you" she said "were very good at mathematics". She asked me to call in one evening when she was at liberty - but I never went again. [note in the margin states that this last paragraph refers to 1931.]13

Sources

1"Information from Free Births, Marriages, and Deaths website: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/" (Internet). Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: England & Wales, FreeBMD Marriage Index: 1837-1983
about Marion Maud Still
Name: Marion Maud Still
Year of Registration: 1906
Quarter of Registration: Jul-Aug-Sep
District: Woolwich
County: Greater London, Kent, London
Volume: 1d
Page: 2310

England & Wales, FreeBMD Marriage Index: 1837-1983
about James George Tringham
Name: James George Tringham
Year of Registration: 1906
Quarter of Registration: Jul-Aug-Sep
District: Woolwich
County: Greater London, Kent, London
Volume: 1d
Page: 2310
Internet. Call Number: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/ (electronic).
2Ibid. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: England & Wales, FreeBMD Birth Index: 1837-1983
about James George Tringham
Name: James George Tringham
Year of Registration: 1880
Quarter of Registration: Oct-Nov-Dec
District: Liverpool (1837-1924)
County: Lancashire
Volume: 8b
Page: 120
3GRO, "1891 Census".
Microfiche.
RG12/530/7/8. Assessment: Primary evidence.
4GRO Indexes.
Text From Source: BMD Search result details

Civil Registration event: Marriage
Name: JAMES, Benjamin
Registration District: Help St. George Hanover Square
County: London
Year of Registration: 1853
Quarter of Registration: Apr-May-Jun
Spouse's last name: Not available before 1912
Volume No: Help 1A
Page No: Help 343

BMD Search result details

Civil Registration event: Marriage
Name: STOREY, Jane
Registration District: Help St. George Hanover Square
County: London
Year of Registration: 1853
Quarter of Registration: Apr-May-Jun
Spouse's last name: Not available before 1912
Volume No: Help 1A
Page No: Help 343
Assessment: Primary evidence.
Text From Source: Births Sep 1881

Marion Maud Still

Woolwich 1d 1098
Family Records Centre, 1 Myddleton Street, LONDON, EC1R 1UW. Tel: 020 8392 5300.
5Marion Maud Tringham nee Still, "Your Great Grand Parents - by Marion Maud Tringham nee Still".
Text From Source: Your Great Grand Parents by Marion Maud Tringham nee Still.
To my children. Brian, Maisie and Theodora

The Stills.

Your Father lived all his young days on the banks of one busy river - the Mersey & I your Mother on the banks of another - the Thames - Liverpool & Woolwich. So in a way we had the same kind of outlook - we were town-bred.
This account was sent as a word document to Graham Hoadly by Marion Maud's grandson, Roger Tringham. He had trancribed it from the original in the possesion of his cousin.

He writes:

My Grandmother wrote her account in about 1940, so there may be occasional lapses of memory.
Assessment: Primary evidence.
Text From Source: The first shop my father took was at Woolwich - 42 Chapel Street which ran straight up from the main Dockyard Gate. It had been a doctors surgery - and was quite small in all ways. Here in 1881 on the 29th of June while the thermometer stood at 91* in the shade - I your Mother was born.
Graham Hoadly.
6"Marian Maud Still 1881". Assessment: Primary evidence.
picture

Source: Marian Maud Still 1881, Marian Maud Still 1881

7"Census 1901 (David U. Still) Woolwich, Kent RG13/567/11/14".
Text From Source: Census 1901 Woolwich, Kent RG13/567/11/14
36 Church Street

David U. Still Head M 55 Kent Staplehurst
Ellen A. Still Wife M 51 Suffolk Mildenhall
Maria M. Still Dau S 19 London Woolwich
Henry Mortimer Serv S 22 Chemist's assistant York Leeds
Assessment: Primary evidence.
8"Information from Free Births, Marriages, and Deaths website: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/" (Internet). Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: Births Jun 1908
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tringham James U S Camberwell 1d 853
Internet. Call Number: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/ (electronic).
9"Kimpton / Bishop Family Bible".
Roger Tringham, Hallow, Worcestershire.
10"Information from Free Births, Marriages, and Deaths website: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/" (Internet). Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: Deaths Sep 1914
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Tringham James U S 6 Birkenhead 8a 602
Internet. Call Number: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/ (electronic).
11GRO Indexes.
Text From Source: BMD Search result details

Civil Registration event: Marriage
Name: JAMES, Benjamin
Registration District: Help St. George Hanover Square
County: London
Year of Registration: 1853
Quarter of Registration: Apr-May-Jun
Spouse's last name: Not available before 1912
Volume No: Help 1A
Page No: Help 343

BMD Search result details

Civil Registration event: Marriage
Name: STOREY, Jane
Registration District: Help St. George Hanover Square
County: London
Year of Registration: 1853
Quarter of Registration: Apr-May-Jun
Spouse's last name: Not available before 1912
Volume No: Help 1A
Page No: Help 343
Assessment: Questionable.
Text From Source: England & Wales, Death Index: 1984-2004
about Theodora Margaret Miller
Name: Theodora Margaret Miller
Birth Date: 19 Sep 1914
Death Registration Month/Year: Apr 2001
Age at death (estimated): 86
Registration district: Hereford
Inferred County: Herefordshire, Monmouthshire
Register number: A21D
Entry Number: 195
Family Records Centre, 1 Myddleton Street, LONDON, EC1R 1UW. Tel: 020 8392 5300.
12Ibid. Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: Births Dec 1914

Theodora M. Tringham (Still) Birkenhead 8a 986
13Marion Maud Tringham nee Still, "Your Great Grand Parents - by Marion Maud Tringham nee Still".
Text From Source: Your Great Grand Parents by Marion Maud Tringham nee Still.
To my children. Brian, Maisie and Theodora

The Stills.

Your Father lived all his young days on the banks of one busy river - the Mersey & I your Mother on the banks of another - the Thames - Liverpool & Woolwich. So in a way we had the same kind of outlook - we were town-bred.
This account was sent as a word document to Graham Hoadly by Marion Maud's grandson, Roger Tringham. He had trancribed it from the original in the possesion of his cousin.

He writes:

My Grandmother wrote her account in about 1940, so there may be occasional lapses of memory.
Assessment: Primary evidence.
Graham Hoadly.