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Family of Samuel HOADLY and Emily GUNTER

Husband: Samuel HOADLY (1804-1865)
Wife: Emily GUNTER (bef1804-1874)
Marriage 18 Jun 1827 St George Hanover Square, Middlesex, London1
St George Hanover Square, Middlesex, London
Witness: Edward WHIGHT Snr.
Witness: Edward WHIGHT Jnr.
Witness: Mary Ann WHIGHT [nee GUNTER]
Witness: Mary DUNN
Witness: William HOADLY Jnr.
Witness: Sarah WHIGHT [nee DEVONSHIRE]
Census (family) 30 Mar 1851 12 Stanhope Place, London2
12 Stanhope Place, London

Husband: Samuel HOADLY

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Samuel HOADLY

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Samuel HOADLY, 2014, age 209

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Samuel HOADLY, 2014, age 209

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Samuel HOADLY, 2014, age 209

Name: Samuel HOADLY
Sex: Male
Father: William HOADLY (1769-1830)
Mother: Catherine RHODES (bef1766-bef1828)
Birth 23 Dec 1804 Week Street, Maidstone, Kent3,4
Christening Week Street Independent Chapel, Maidstone, Kent5
Residence 18 Jun 1827 (age 22) St George Hanover Square, Middlesex, London1
St George Hanover Square, Middlesex, London
Court Case 14 Feb 1833 (age 28) London, Middlesex
The Old Bailey, London, Middlesex
JAMES MOORE, theft: simple grand larceny, 14 Feb 1833.
The Proceedings of the Old Bailey Ref: t18330214-228
Homepage » Search » Results » Session Text


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Trial Summary:
Crime(s): theft : simple grand larceny,
Verdict: Not Guilty,
Other trials on 14 Feb 1833
Name search for: JAMES MOORE,
Associated Records...

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Original Text:
NEW COURT. WENDESDAY, FEBRUARY 20TH.

Fifth Middlesex Jury, before Mr. Common Sergeant.

657. JAMES MOORE was indicted for stealing, on
See originalthe 14th of February, 1 piece of cloth, value 6d.; 1 wrench, value 3s.; 1 patent cutter, value 3s.; 2 head-knuckles, value 2s. 6d.; 10 plates, value 1s.; 3 hinges, value 3d.; 100 screws, value 6d.; 64 bolts, 2s.; 100 brads, value 6d.; 2 knives, value 1s.; 1 file, value 1s., and 1 fork, value 6d., the goods of Samuel Hoadley.

MR. CLARKSON conducted the prosecution.

SAMUEL HOADLEY. I am a coach-maker; my manufactory is in Hind-mews - the prisoner was eighteen months in my employ. On the 14th of February, I got an officer, and went to his house; I there found this piece of cloth, which I know to be mine - the prisoner denied it, and said he had bought it in Oxford-street, but afterwards he said he thought it was mine - that he had put into his pocket to do a job to some nobleman's carriage, and had forgotten to take it out of his pocket again; but he had no business with it, as he is not employed in that way - I found this patent washer-cutter there and some other things; this cutter has my initials on it - I found this file, these brads, and other articles; I found this wrench, which he acknowledged to be mine; he said he had had it upwards of six months to do a job, and had forgotten to return it - these two knives and a fork have the name of Gurney, of Maidstone, on them, and I bought them there by chance - the value of the property is about 100l.

COURT. Q. Might he have had these things for use, and not returned them? A. I found part of my property working up for other persons; he ought not to have worked for other persons - he told me he was satisfied with his wages, and did not wish to work over-time.

ROBERT CROWE (Police-serjeant D). I took the prisoner.

Prisoner's Defence. This washer-cutter my master gave me to use, and said if I lost it he should expect another made - I could not use it, and he got me a new one made; I took the wrench in my pocket on the Saturday before to work at the other shop; I took it to my house to take the next morning - I took the piece of cloth to finish a gentleman's carriage, and there is grease on it now; I did not say I bought it, my wife said she thought I had - these brads and screws are what I bought before I went to the prosecutor; I was out of a situation four months, and worked for different stable-keepers, in repairing carriages.

MR. HOADLEY. He was a coach-maker's labourer, not a coach-maker; I should not think he could repair carriages; he stated that he bought near a thousand nails and brads at the same place where he said he bought this file, but they do not sell files there; I lost some thousands of screws in whole papers, and these papers were found at his house.

NOT GUILTY.
Court Case 16 Nov 1833 (age 28) London, Middlesex
Insolvent Debtor's Court, London
The Times: Monday November 18th 1833

INSOLVENT DEBTORS' COURT, Nov. 16

Frederick John Street was opposed by Mr. Cooke for Mr. Hoadly, coachmaker, of Oxford-street; by Mr. Woodroffe for Mr. Gardiner, of the Bull Inn, Holborn; and by Mr. Palliser, saddler, of Finsbury, in person: he was supported by Mr. Nicholls.
The insolvent came of age in 1831; he had been entitled under the will of his father to 1,450l. His debts amounted to 800l. In the commencement of the present year he had contracted the debt due to Mr. Hoadly; it amounted to 147l: before the contracting of this debt he had bought a cabriolet of Mr. Hoadly, and paid for it in ready money; the present debt of 147l was for a Tilbury and gig, made to order. Mr. Hoadly deposed that he had given the insolvent credit upon his representation to him that he had an income of 1,200l a year, which he received by quarterly payments, and that his demand should be paid out of that income. This statement as to the representation of his income the insolvent denied ever to have been made by him to Mr. Hoadly. Mr. Hoadly had also made some inquiries amongst persons at Brighton as to the respectability of the insolvent, and the answers to them had been satisfactory. The demand of 147l not having been paid within a reasonable time, legal measures were adopted to compel the payment, and in August last, by the consent of a Mr. Waterman of Sutton, who had acted on the occasion as attorney for the insolvent, judgement was signed for the plaintiff in the action. This consent was almost on the very eve of the day of trial at the assizes at Croydon, and had eventually produced no pecuniary benefit to Mr. Hoadly, who had incurred great expense in the prosecution of his suit.
Mr Gardiner, of the Bull Inn, Holborn, had been induced to trust the insolvent from the respectability of his appearance. He had lived some time at the Bull , and his horses, gigs, &c, had "stood" in the yard at that place. He had heard from a Mr. Adams, who drove one of the Brighton coaches, that he was a respectable man. His tavern bill at the Bull accounted to upwards of 19l., no part of which had been paid. Mr. Gardiner had been so impressed with the notion of the respectability and integrity of his guest, that he had been induced to become bail for him in the action brought by Mr. Hoadly; he had understood him to be worth 1,200l a year, but could not positively affirm that the insolvent had so represented his income to him, or that he had become bail on that representation. Mr. Gardiner, however, "had never been so deceived in his life:" in consequence of his having become bail, he had by the behaviour of the insolvent been very nearly saddled with the debt of 147l due to Mr. Hoadly, and it had cost him in law expenses nearly 30l to relieve himself from the responsibility he had incurred. The insolvent had gone down to Sutton to the house of Mr. Waterman, the attorney, and Mr. Gardiner had followed him in a postchaise, brought him back to London, and rendered him a prisoner to the Fleet, in discharge of himself. He described him as "seemingly very shy" on the occasion.
Mr. Palliser, who conducted his own case, complained in no measured terms of the conduct of the insolvent, whom he described as having come to his shop in the beginning of the present year, and ordered a couple of horse-collars. Mr. Palliser had been directed to take his bill on the evening the order was executed to the Craven Hotel, at which place the insolvent had resided previously to his appearance at the Bull; he had done so, but had been told that Mr. Street had gone to the play: he had received a further order for harness &c., to be sent to Brighton, which, as he considered the insolvent a respectable man, he had executed: payment, however, being delayed, his suspicions had been excited; he had written a very forcible letter to Brighton to the insolvent, which had been answered by another person in the name of the insolvent; in the answer promises of payment were held out, which had not been complied with.
In the course of the examination it appeared that shortly before going to prison the insolvent had been in possession of seven horses, a Tilbury, and a gig; that in the course of the present year he had contracted bills with saddlers and harness-makers to the amount of 112l; that no part of this property was now forthcoming for the benefit of the creditors; and that, with the exception of a curious specification in the schedule of "pigeons, a pheasant, two dogs, mud boots," &c., there was little or nothing to liquidate their demands.
It was urged by Mr. Cooke that this case exhibited one of the most disgraceful scenes that had ever come before a court of justice. The debt to Mr. Hoadly had been incurred by a fraudulent representation; and subsequently to the incurring of it, property, which ought to have gone to pay it and other creditors, had been made away with in a most unjustifiable manner. To support the latter ground of opposition, the learned gentleman alluded to evidence which had been given by several witnesses, from which it appeared that the insolvent had purchased straw and corn of Mr. Waterman, senior, the father of Waterman the attorney, to the amount of 14l 16s.; that Waterman, the attorney, acting as attorney for his father, had brought an action to recover that amount; that he had signed judgement and taken out execution for the debt and costs; that two of the horses, a Tilbury and two sets of harness had been sold at the Greyhound Inn, at Sutton, under the execution, and had produced 64l, of which produce, after satisfying the debt and costs and paying the expenses of the sale &c., scarcely a fraction was left for the creditors; that the sale under the execution had taken place since the insolvent had bee in prison, and whilst Waterman, the attorney, had been employed as his attorney in other business; and that it was in evidence upon the oaths of Mr. Blackenbury (a friend both of the insolvent and of Waterman the attorney), and of the insolvent himself, that an exchange of horses had taken place at the house of Waterman, the attorney, between Waterman, the attorney, and the insolvent, which exchange was to go in discharge of the debt due to Waterman the elder. Mr. Blackenbury, however, could not swear that it was to go in discharge of the costs in the action, nor did he give his testimony till pressed by the Court. Waterman himself distinctly denied that the exchange was to go in discharge of the debt or costs.
It came out in the course of examination, that a Mrs. Yates, the mother of the insolvent, had since his confinement in the Fleet Prison remitted to him 170l, of which sum no mention was made in his special balance-sheet; to account for the disposition of this money it was now stated that 25l had been returned to Mrs. Yates, about 70l had been expended in the support of the insolvent, and about 60l had been retained by Mr. Waterman to meet his demand for costs incurred in actions brought against defendant, in which he had been employed by him subsequently or immediately previous to his going to prison in July last.
The learned Commissioner BOWEN, after a patient examination of the evidence, which lasted the whole day, adjourned the case for the production of a verified account of all money transactions between Mrs. Yates and the insolvent; for the production of the banking account kept with Messrs. West, Hall and Co., of Brighton; for an account current of all payments &c., between Mr. Waterman, the attorney, and the insolvent; for an amendment of the special balance-sheet of the schedule; and for the insolvent to re-advertise his residence at a place he had omitted to state. The learned Commissioner then stated, that when these things should have been done, an adjudication should be given, and that the adjudication would subject the insolvent to a very long remand.
Court Case 28 Apr 1834 (age 29) London, Middlesex
Insolvent Debtors' Court, London
The Times: Tuesday April 29th 1834

INSOLVENT DEBTORS' COURT, April 28

Cesar Adam Marcus de Wuits, Count de Wuits, was opposed by Messrs Nicholls and Bodkin, for Mr. Samuel Hoadly, of Oxford-street, coach-builder, and for Lady Hamilton Williams, executrix of Sir Andrew Williams; by Mr. Cresswell, for Mr. Hartwig, a dealer in cigars, &c., at Antwerp, and other creditors at Antwerp; by Mr. Sandford, fdor Messrs. Houlditch, coach-makers, Long-acre, and for Mr. Bull. He was supported by Messrs. Cooke and Woodroffe.
The insolvent was before the Court on a former occasion, in March last, when his case was adjourned, in order that amendments might be made to the schedule &c.
It appeared that the Count had married a lady of fortune, of Glamorganshire, of the name of Gwynne, in the year 1823; the marriage had been celebrated at the chapel of the British Embassy at Paris. In May last the Count and his wife arrived in England. The total amount of the debts and liabilities of the Count was about 10,000l; of this sum he had received consideration for 1,500l only, which debts were due to foreign and English creditors; the debts due to the latter creditors were 500l. Four horses and some other property had been given up to the officer of the court for the benefit of the creditors.
The opposition of Mr. Hoadly was grounded on his own evidence, and that of a person in his employment, that the insolvent had represented to him that he had certain property in Wales, but that the rents would not be available for some months; he bought a phaeton of Mr. Hoadly, for which he gave a bill of exchange for 70 guineas, payable at six months, and referred him to a saddle-maker and a horse-dealer for testimonials of his capability of payment. The reference proved satisfactory. The insolvent subsequently hired a cabriolet of Mr. Hoadly, and was in his debt for the hiring and some other things, to the amount of 20l. The bill of exchange for 170 guineas was not yet due; but it was held by the Court that Mr. Hoadly was entitled to oppose upon it as a debt for which he was a creditor.
On the cross examination of Mr. Hoadly by Mr. COOKE, it was admitted by that person that he had seen the insolvent in prison, and proposed to him to omit his name from his schedule, and pay him his demand after his discharge from prison. Mr. Hoadly affirmed that he was not aware that it was imperative on the insolvent to set forth every debt in his schedule; he had no idea that he had made a proposition that he ought not to have made.
The COURT regretted that such a proposition had been made, for it was impossible after such an admission that the opposition could be supported. The learned Chief Commissioner wished it to be distinctly understood, and widely circulated, that the Court would never suffer a creditor to maintain an opposition after a proposition of the character of that to which he alluded.
Mr. CRESSWELL produced no evidence on the part of the Antwerp creditors, and his opposition in consequence came to nothing.
Mr. SANDFORD did not produce Mr. Houlditch or any evidence on his behalf, and his opposition was consequently not substantiated.
An inquiry was then made into the property, and into the disposal of certain plate, &c., but nothing was established to affect the insolvent. Mr. Houlditch had had a brizschka returned to him, and an offer had been made to Mr. Hoadly to return to him the phaeton he had sold to the insolvent.
The insolvent, who is a remarkably fine young man, gave his answers with the greatest candour; it appeared from them that he had paid in cash and bills nearly 200,000 francs for his father, who is a French General, now living at Lechlin-castle, in the neighbourhood of Antwerp, but that he had not put his name in his schedule as a debtor to that amount.
The COURT ultimately adjourned the case for an inventory of the contents of two boxes at the house of the solicitor of the insolvent, and for the production of a person of the name of Lyon, and another of the name of Colbez, and for 10l to be paid into court as the value of a diamond ring which the insolvent had given to a lady.
Auction 18 Jul 1838 (age 33) London, Middlesex
92 New Bond-street, London, Middlesex
The Times: Wednesday July 18th 1838

No 92 New Bond-street, 3 Woodstock-street, Oxford-street, and Hinde's-mews, Marylebone

MESSRS. LESLIE and SON will SELL by AUCTION, upon the Premises, 92 New Bond-street, in July, by order of the Assignees of Mr. Hoadly, coachmaker, the valuable LEASES of a capital DWELLING-HOUSE and front SHOW SHOP, in New Bond-street, held at a low rent; a substantial manufactory and shop, 3, Woodstock-street, held for nearly 30 years; and an extensive manufactory, yard, stable, workshops, and premises, in Hinde's-mews, Marylebone-lane, 16 years of which are unexpired, at the low yearly rent of £97. May be viewed until the sale, and particulars had upon the premises; of Messrs. Burgoynes and Thrupp, solicitors, 160, Oxford-street, west corner of Stratford-place; of G. Gibson, Esq., official assignee, Basinghall-street; and of Leslie and Son, auctioneers, 45, Margaret-street, Cavendish-square.
Dividend 1 Aug 1838 (age 33) London, Middlesex
The Times: Wednesday August 1st 1838

DIVIDENDS ….

CERTIFICATES to be granted, unless cause be shown to the contrary on or before Aug. 21

… S. Hoadly, New Bond-street, Hanover-square, coach-maker
Auction 9 Aug 1839 (age 34) London, Middlesex
36 St Martin's lane, Charing Cross, London
The Times: Friday Aug 9th 1839 Page 1

CARRIAGES. - Mr. HOADLY begs to announce that he is instructed to SELL by AUCTION on the Premises 36 St Martin's lane, Charing Cross, THIS DAY, August 9, at 12, a large STOCK of excellent new and second hand fashionable CARRIAGES; consisting of coaches, landaus, chariots, landaulets, barouches, britzakas, barouchets, a britzaka landaulet, mail driving phaetons, cabriolet phaetons, shifting body phaetons, cabriolets, tilburies, stanhopes, light gigs, a deer or luggage van, other carriages, harness and coachmakers' effects. May be viewed. Catalogues had on the premises; or at the auctioneer's office, 1 Newman-street, Oxford-street.
Auction 24 Aug 1839 (age 34) London
36 St Martin's-lane, London
The Times: Saturday Aug 24th 1839 Page 1

CARRIAGES by AUCTION. - Mr. HOADLY begs to announce that he will SELL by AUCTION on the Premises, 36 St Martin's-lane, on Thursday, August 29, a large ASSORTMENT of new and second-hand well-built fashionable CARRIAGES; consisting of coaches, chariots, landaus, barouches, britzakas, droitzalm chariots, barouchets, britzaka phaetons, mail driving phaetons, phaetons, cab phaetons, cabriolets, stanhopes, tilburies, and other coachmakers' effects, dry ash plank &c. Those desirous of sending carriages or other effects in the coachmaking trade should make early application at his carriage agency office, 1 Newman-street, Oxford-street. May be viewed three days previous to the sale and catalogues had on the premises.
Census 6 Jun 1841 (age 35) Chiswick, Middlesex6
Turnham Green Terrace, Chiswick, Middlesex
Occupation 6 Jun 1841 (age 36) Auctioneer; Chiswick, Middlesex6
Auction 20 Mar 1843 (age 38) London, Middlesex
6 Brecknock-terrace, Camden Town, London
The Times: Monday March 20th 1843

Brecknock-terrace, Camden-town. - Modern Furniture

MR. HOADLY will SELL by AUCTION, on the Premises, 6 Brecknock-terrace, To-morrow, March 21, at 12, the excellent modern HOUSEHOLD FURNITURE; comprising rosewood sofa and chairs, loo, card, and other tables, rosewood cabinet, easy chair, dining room chairs and table, handsome chimney-glasses, plated tea and breakfast service, four-post and other bedsteads with furniture, excellent feather beds and bedding, mahogany chests of drawers, handsome mahogany marble-top washstands and fittings, dressing tables and glasses, carpets, linen, china, glass, plated articles, floorcloth, and numerous effects; also a fashionable phaeton; by order of the assignees of Mr. Alexander Hay, a bankrupt. Catalogues had on the premises; of T. Alenger, Esq., official assignee; and at the auctioneer's offices, 41 Margaret-street, Cavendish-square, and 87, Newman-street, Oxford-street.
Census 30 Mar 1851 (age 45) St Pancras, Middlesex7
12, Stanhope Place, Saint Pancras, Marylebone, Middlesex
Occupation 30 Mar 1851 (age 46) Auctioneer; St Pancras, Middlesex7
Death 1 Oct 1865 (age 60) 28 George Street, Portman Square, London8,9
Residence 2 Oct 1865 (est) (age 60) Marylebone, London10
28 George Street, Portman Square
Burial 5 Oct 1865 (age 61) Brompton, Middlesex10
Brompton Cemetery, Brompton, Middlesex

Wife: Emily GUNTER

Name: Emily GUNTER
Sex: Female
Father: Thomas GUNTER (1759?-1809)
Mother: Hannah ? (1775?-1807)
Birth bef 5 Feb 1804 Orpington, Kent
Christening 5 Feb 1804 (age 0) Orpington, Kent11
Residence 18 Jun 1827 (age 23) St George Hanover Square, Middlesex1
Census 6 Jun 1841 (age 35) Chiswick, Middlesex6
Turnham Green Terrace, Chiswick, Middlesex
Census 30 Mar 1851 (age 46) St Pancras, Middlesex7
12, Stanhope Place, Saint Pancras, Marylebone, Middlesex
Census 2 Apr 1871 (age 68) Dursley Gloucestershire12
Parsonage Street, Dursley, Gloucestershire
Occupation 2 Apr 1871 (age 67) Annuitant; Dursley Gloucestershire12
Will 23 Mar 1874 (age 70) Peckham, Surrey13
3 Magdala Terrace Denman Road Peckham in the County of Surrey
I Emily Hoadley of number 3 Magdala Terrace Denman Road Peckham in the County of Surrey Widow hereby revoke all former Wills by me heretofore made and declare this to be my last Will and testament.
I appoint my nephew Alfred Blackney of Dursley in the County of Gloucester Executor of this my Will.
I give and bequeath to my niece Elizabeth Katherine Grey my tea service the piece of stair carpet and two pyro silver knives.
I give and bequeath to my nephew Alfred Grey Chambers's Encyclopaedia bound and unbound.
I give and bequeath to my niece Alice Ellinor Boura my rosewood writing desk, the best tea pot and one spoon belonging to the tea caddy, the little leather bag lined with red silk, the silver fruit knife and silver scent box, two pyro silver knives, two silver salt spoons and a mustard spoon.
I give and bequeath to Rosa Blackney the other spoon belonging to the tea caddy and two pyro silver knives.
I give and bequeath to my nephew Alfred Blackney the [Chinese chess men and ?]
I give and bequeath to Edward [Boura?] the other chess board and men and a [bath?]
I give and bequeath to Arthur Charles Boura my leather writing case and cover and any books he likes to select.
I give and bequeath to Emma Pierpoint my large black bag, my tea caddy, two plated table spoons, silver and [?] a dinner service and culinary utensils, a large woollen cape a black silk [dress?] and velvetine [?] and a remnant of black velvetine, two glass salt cellars, the bed room carpet, the metal tea pot and the sum of nineteen guineas.
I give devise and bequeath the rest and residue of my estate both real and personal unto my sister Mary Ann Blackney, and if she be dead then to her daughter Rosa Blackney.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this twenty third day of March one thousand eight hundred and seventy four - Emily Hoadley -
Signed and acknowledged by the said testatrix as and for her last Will and testament in the presence of us both present at the same time who in her presence at her request and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses. The word "three" in the last line on the second page having been first erased and the word "four" written -
Catherine Haisell 3 Magdala Terrace, Denman Road, Peckham -
Wm. Honey 2 Broad Sanctuary, Westminster - Solicitor.

Proved at London 27th April 1874 by the oath of Alfred Blackney the nephew the sole Executor to whom Admon. Was granted.
Death 27 Mar 1874 (age 70) Guy's Hospital8,14
"Of 3 Magdala Terrace, Denman Rd., Peckham, Surrey
Burial 30 Mar 1874 Brompton, Middlesex15,16
Brompton Cemetery, Brompton, Middlesex
Buried by Rev. A. Veysey from Camberwell Church
Burial No: 74928
Grave No: Common Grave AF249.0x67"3
Grave 8ft

Note on Husband: Samuel HOADLY (1) - shared note

Photo shows 28 George Street where Samuel died. The premises are now (2003) incorporated into a hotel.

 

Samuel's Apprenticeship indentures:

"Samuel Hoadly son of William Hoadly of Maidstone in the County of Kent, Coachmaker and Herald Painter, of his own free will doth put himself to the said William Hoadly, his father, to serve from the date of the indenture for the term of seven years, to learn the Art, trade, Mystery and business of a Coachmaker and Herald Painter. Indenture dated 9th February 1820.

Enrolled 11th February 1820 at Maidstone"

"Maidstone Burghmote, held the 27th day of April 1826 before John Wise Esq., Mayor...At this court also came Samuel Hoadly, a younger son of William Hoadly of this Town, Coachmaker, a Freeman of this Corporation and desired to be made free by his father's copy according to the custom, and he is allowed the same and hath paid his common fine forty shillings, and hath taken his Freeman's oath, and the other oaths, and he is made free.

 

"Post Office London directory:

1829: [Names too late for regular insertion: Hoadley S. Coachmaker 296 Oxford Street, near Bond Street

1834: 296 Oxford Street, and Hinde Mews, Marylebone Lane.

Ditto:

1835/6/7/8: 92 New Bond Street and Hinde Mews, Marylebone Lane.

Ditto:

1840: 1 Newman Street, Oxford Street.

Ditto :

1844/5/6: 41 Margaret Street, Cavendish Square

Ditto:

1847: 58 Margaret Street, Cavendish Square

Ditto :

1848: 41 Margaret Street, Cavendish Square

Ditto :

1851: 38 Foley Place, Great Portland Street.

 

In 1851, Samuel and Emily resided at 12 Stanhope Place, London.

[HO107/1493/793/77]

 

Samuel and Emily do not appear to have had children.

Note on Husband: Samuel HOADLY (2)

Samuel and Emily cannot be found on the 1861 census although they were both alive at

Note on Wife: Emily GUNTER (1) - shared note

 

The wedding of Samuel and Emily was witnessed by Edward Wight Snr., Mary Dunn [who was to marry his brother, Alexander in 1833], Mary Ann Whight, Edward Whight Jnr., William Hoadly Jnr., [his brother], and Sarah Whight.

 

Her will was administrated by her nephew, Alfred Blackney, a coachbuilder of Dursley, Gloucestershire. In Parsonage Street, Dursley, the 1881 census lists a Thomas Blackney, Coachbuilder, aged 65 born in Chislehurst, Kent, was living with his unmarried daughter, Rosa, aged 36, also from Chislehurst. [RG11/2520/4/1]

 

WILL:

"I Emily Hoadley [sic] of number 3 Magdala Terrace Denman Road Peckham in the County of Surrey Widow hereby revoke all former Wills by me heretofore made and declare this to be my last Will and testament.

I appoint my nephew Alfred Blackney of Dursley in the County of Gloucester Executor of this my Will.

I give and bequeath to my niece Elizabeth Katherine Grey my tea service the piece of stair carpet and two pyro silver knives.

I give and bequeath to my nephew Alfred Grey Chambers's Encyclopaedia bound and unbound.

I give and bequeath to my niece Alice Ellinor Boura my rosewood writing desk, the best tea pot and one spoon belonging to the tea caddy, the little leather bag lined with red silk, the silver fruit knife and silver scent box, two pyro silver knives, two silver salt spoons and a mustard spoon.

I give and bequeath to Rosa Blackney the other spoon belonging to the tea caddy and two pyro silver knives.

I give and bequeath to my nephew Alfred Blackney the [Chinese chess men and ?]

I give and bequeath to Edward [Boura?] the other chess board and men and a [bath?]

I give and bequeath to Arthur Charles Boura my leather writing case and cover and any books he likes to select.

I give and bequeath to Emma Pierpoint my large black bag, my tea caddy, two plated table spoons, silver and [?] a dinner service and culinary utensils, a large woollen cape a black silk [dress?] and velvetine [?] and a remnant of black velvetine, two glass salt cellars, the bed room carpet, the metal tea pot and the sum of nineteen guineas.

I give devise and bequeath the rest and residue of my estate both real and personal unto my sister Mary Ann Blackney, and if she be dead then to her daughter Rosa Blackney.

In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this twenty third day of March one thousand eight hundred and seventy four - Emily Hoadley -

Signed and acknowledged by the said testatrix as and for her last Will and testament in the presence of us both present at the same time who in her presence at her request and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses. The word "three" in the last line on the second page having been first erased and the word "four" written -

Catherine Haisell 3 Magdala Terrace, Denman Road, Peckham -

Wm. Honey 2 Broad Sanctuary, Westminster - Solicitor.

 

Proved at London 27th April 1874 by the oath of Alfred Blackney the nephew the sole Executor to whom Admon. Was granted.

Note on Wife: Emily GUNTER (2)

Emily seems to have had a complicated and sad childhood. From evidence in contemporary wills it would seem that both her parents

Sources

1"Marriage St George Hanover Square, Middlesex, London (St George Hanover Square, Middlesex, London) 18 Jun 1827 Samuel HOADLY & Emily GUNTER" (502).
Text From Source: Marriage solemnized in the Parish of St George Hanover Square in the Year 1827
Samuel HOADLY of this Parish
Emily GUNTER of St George Hanover Square Parish
were married in this church By Licence by Consent of
their parents this 18 Day of
June in the year 1827
By me Evan Nepean - A.M. Curate
This marriage was Solemnized between us
Samuel HOADLY and Emily GUNTER
In the presence of Witnesses: Edward WHIGHT,
Edward WHIGHT,
Mary Ann GUNTER,
Mary DUNN,
William HOADLY,
Sarah DEVONSHIRE
No: 502
picture

Source: Marriage St George Hanover Square, Middlesex, London (St George Hanover Square, Middlesex, London) 18 Jun 1827 Samuel HOADLY & Emily GUNTER, Samuel Hoadly & Emily Gunter St George Hanover Square 1827

2GRO, 1851 census (Microfilm).
Text From Source: 1851 census
Cit. Date: 30 March 1851. Assessment: Primary evidence.
Text From Source: CENSUS DATE: 30 March 1851
CENSUS ADDRESS: 12 Stanhope Place, London
CENSUS REF NO: HO107/1493/793/77

Name Rel: to head Condition Age Profession Where Born

Samuel Hoadly Head Mar 45 Auctioneer Maidstone, Kent
Emily Hoadly Wife Mar 46 Chislehurst, Kent
Family Records Centre, 1 Myddleton Street, LONDON, EC1R 1UW. Tel: 020 8392 5300.
3Dr Williams Library.
Text From Source: Dr Williams Library - (Mainly Non-Conformist baptisms) Information supplied by Mrs J.W. Spashett of Kent FHS.
Assessment: Primary evidence.
Text From Source: From Dr Williams Library 1799-1802: PRO Ref: RG5/65

E No 4249

These are to certify, That Samuel Hoadly
son of William Hoadly
and Cathrine Hoadly his Wife, who was Daughter of
John and Mary Rhodes was Born in Week Street
in the Parish of Maidstone
in the County of Kent the Twenty
Day of December in the Year One Thousand
Eight Hundred and Four at whose Birth we were present.
Mary Honey
Frances Jackson
Elizth Rhodes

247

Registered at Dr. Williams's Library, Redcross-Street, near Cripplegate, London
Novr 22nd 1816 Thos. Morgan Registrar
4Church of the Latter Day Saints, "http://www.familysearch.org/".
Text From Source: Family Search website
Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: IGI Individual Record FamilySearch™ International Genealogical Index v5.0
British Isles
Search Results | Download

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SAMUEL HOADLY Pedigree
Male


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Event(s):
Birth: 23 DEC 1804 Dr Williams Library, London, London, England

Christening:
Death:
Burial:


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Parents:
Father: WILLIAM HOADLY Family
Mother: CATHRINE


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Messages:
Extracted birth or christening record for the locality listed in the record. The source records are usually arranged chronologically by the birth or christening date.


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Source Information:
Batch No.: Dates: Source Call No.: Type: Printout Call No.: Type:

C146158 1816 0815997 Film NONE


Sheet:
Internet. Call Number: http://www.familysearch.org/ (electronic).
5Dr Williams Library.
Text From Source: Dr Williams Library - (Mainly Non-Conformist baptisms) Information supplied by Mrs J.W. Spashett of Kent FHS.
6"Census 1841 (Samuel Hoadly) Chiswick, Middlesex HO107/689/1/8/10".
Text From Source: Samuel Hoadly 35 Auctioneer No
Emily Hoadly 35 No
Sarah Wight 70 Ind. Yes
Lucy Phillips 20 F.S. Yes
John Wimbridge 40 Ind. No
Assessment: Primary evidence.
picture

Source: Census 1841 (Samuel Hoadly) Chiswick, Middlesex HO107/689/1/8/10, Samuel Hoadly 41

7"(Samuel Hoadly) Census 1851 St Pancras, Middlesex HO107/1493/793/77" (HO107/1493/793/77).
Text From Source: Name,Relation,Married?,Sex,Age,Occupation,Born,Infirmity
Samuel HOADLY,Head,Mar,M,45,Auctioneer,Maidstone, Kent,
Emily HOADLY,Wife,Mar,F,46,,Chislehurst, Kent,
picture

Source: (Samuel Hoadly) Census 1851 St Pancras, Middlesex HO107/1493/793/77, Samuel Hoadly 51

8Will.
Text From Source: Wills (Somerset House, Strand, London)
Copy in possession of Graham Hoadly.
Principal Registry Family Division, First Avenue House, 42-49 High Holborn, LONDON, WC1V 6NP. Tel: 020 7947 6946.
9"Information from Free Births, Marriages, and Deaths website: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/" (Internet). Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: Name: Hoadly, Samuel
Record Type: Deaths
Quarter: December
Year: 1865
District: Marylebone
County: London Middlesex
Volume: 1a
Page: _27
Internet. Call Number: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/ (electronic).
10"Burial Brompton, Middlesex 5 OCT 1865 Samuel HOADLY" (42517).
Text From Source: Burials in Brompton Cemetery, Brompton, Middlesex in the year 1865
Name: Samuel HOADLY
Abode: 28 George Street, Portman Square, Marylebone
Burial Date: 5 OCT 1865
Age: 61
By whom the Ceremony was performed: Revd. N. Liberty
Place of Burial and No. of Grant: Private Grave: G234.3 x 25.3
From what Parish etc Removed: St Marylebone - Church
Remarks: Grave 10ft. Right of Interment purchased 31 January 1876.
picture

Source: Burial Brompton, Middlesex 5 OCT 1865 Samuel HOADLY, Burial Brompton, Middlesex 5 OCT 1865 Samuel HOADLY

picture

Source: Burial Brompton, Middlesex 5 OCT 1865 Samuel HOADLY, Area where Samuel Hoadly is buried - Brompton Cemetery

11Church of the Latter Day Saints, International Genealogical Index (http://www.familysearch.org/).
Text From Source: International Genealogical Index
12"Census 1871 (Mary Ann Blackney) Dursley Gloucestershire RG10/2594/17/26".
Text From Source: Thomas Blackney Head Mar 55 Kent Chislehurst
Mary A Blackney Wife Mar 70 Kent Orpington
Alfred Blackney Son Un 29 Kent Chislehurst
Rosa Blackney Dau Un 27 Kent Chislehurst
Emily Hoadley Sister-in-Law W 68 Kent Orpington
Assessment: Primary evidence.
picture

Source: Census 1871 (Mary Ann Blackney) Dursley Gloucestershire RG10/2594/17/26, Emily Hoadly 71

13Will.
Text From Source: Wills (Somerset House, Strand, London)
Copy in possession of Graham Hoadly.
Assessment: Primary evidence.
Text From Source: I Emily Hoadley of number 3 Magdala Terrace Denman Road Peckham in the County of Surrey Widow hereby revoke all former Wills by me heretofore made and declare this to be my last Will and testament.
I appoint my nephew Alfred Blackney of Dursley in the County of Gloucester Executor of this my Will.
I give and bequeath to my niece Elizabeth Katherine Grey my tea service the piece of stair carpet and two pyro silver knives.
I give and bequeath to my nephew Alfred Grey Chambers's Encyclopaedia bound and unbound.
I give and bequeath to my niece Alice Ellinor Boura my rosewood writing desk, the best tea pot and one spoon belonging to the tea caddy, the little leather bag lined with red silk, the silver fruit knife and silver scent box, two pyro silver knives, two silver salt spoons and a mustard spoon.
I give and bequeath to Rosa Blackney the other spoon belonging to the tea caddy and two pyro silver knives.
I give and bequeath to my nephew Alfred Blackney the [Chinese chess men and ?]
I give and bequeath to Edward [Boura?] the other chess board and men and a [bath?]
I give and bequeath to Arthur Charles Boura my leather writing case and cover and any books he likes to select.
I give and bequeath to Emma Pierpoint my large black bag, my tea caddy, two plated table spoons, silver and [?] a dinner service and culinary utensils, a large woollen cape a black silk [dress?] and velvetine [?] and a remnant of black velvetine, two glass salt cellars, the bed room carpet, the metal tea pot and the sum of nineteen guineas.
I give devise and bequeath the rest and residue of my estate both real and personal unto my sister Mary Ann Blackney, and if she be dead then to her daughter Rosa Blackney.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand this twenty third day of March one thousand eight hundred and seventy four - Emily Hoadley -
Signed and acknowledged by the said testatrix as and for her last Will and testament in the presence of us both present at the same time who in her presence at her request and in the presence of each other have hereunto subscribed our names as witnesses. The word "three" in the last line on the second page having been first erased and the word "four" written -
Catherine Haisell 3 Magdala Terrace, Denman Road, Peckham -
Wm. Honey 2 Broad Sanctuary, Westminster - Solicitor.

Proved at London 27th April 1874 by the oath of Alfred Blackney the nephew the sole Executor to whom Admon. Was granted.
Principal Registry Family Division, First Avenue House, 42-49 High Holborn, LONDON, WC1V 6NP. Tel: 020 7947 6946.
14"Information from Free Births, Marriages, and Deaths website: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/" (Internet). Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: Name: Hoadley, Emily
Record Type: Deaths
Age at death: 70
Quarter: March
Year: 1874
District: St Olave Southwark
County: London Surrey
Volume: 1d
Page: 131
Internet. Call Number: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/ (electronic).
15"Brompton Cemetery Records" (Brompton Cemetery Burial Register).
Deceasedonline.com. Web: Deceasedonline.co.uk.
16"Emily Hoadly Burial Record".
Emily, curiously, appears not to have been buried with her husband, Samuel Hoadly, but in an unmarked common grave nearby his burial plot in Brompton Cemetery.
picture

Source: Emily Hoadly Burial Record, Emily Hoadly Burial Reg 1874