See also

Eleanor Annie STILL (1874-1896)

picture

Eleanor Annie STILL

picture

Eleanor Annie STILL

picture

Eleanor Annie STILL

picture

Eleanor Annie STILL

picture

Eleanor Annie STILL

Name: Eleanor Annie STILL1,2
Sex: Female
Father: David Usborne STILL (bef1846-1932)
Mother: Ellen Agnes KIMPTON (1849-1931)

Individual Events and Attributes

Birth 25 Oct 1874 Edenbridge, Kent1,3,4,5
Marsh Green Farm, Edenbridge, Kent
Census 3 Apr 1881 (age 6) Woolwich, Kent6
42 Chapel Street, Woolwich, Kent
RG11/0744/16/26
Census 5 Apr 1891 (age 16) Woolwich, Kent7
36 Church Street, Woolwich, Kent
Occupation Pupil School Teacher [1891];7
Death 19 Sep 1896 (age 21)8,9

Individual Note

Nelsie had attended a Miss Allen school where she learned a song "Watching for Pa". Then a new school opened kept by a German Herr Meissersmidt & both Nelsie & Dora went to that. There were many Germans in Charlton working in the German firm of Siemens Electrical Engineers Charlton. We had a German maid Elizabeth Lines who could not speak English, so as to help with my sister's German. But she learned English quicker than my sisters were taught German.

 

Both Nelsie & Dora were big girls comely with very nice complexions while I was dark & pale & rather thin. They had had a few years at the farm as tiny children it may have made a difference.

 

Nelsie was grey-eyed with a pink & white complexion & soft dark hair. Later on I was to brush it of a night - 50 times for a halfpenny ! She was rather reserved but could talk well on serious subjects.

 

Nelsie was eager to learn & practised the piano an hour a day. She was very musical & had a pretty singing voice. About this time Nelsie became a pupil teacher at Wood St. Infants School. She would now be about fifteen years old. She attended the "Centre" where I too was to go later on. She was one of the most promising pupils there. Top of her year & took part in the debates held from time to time. Mama coached her for these & probably helped her to write them - I remember one paper ended up with a verse from Holents

"Few shall part where many meet

The snow shall be their winding sheet

And every turf beneath their feet

Shall be a soldier's sepulcher"

But what it was all about I don't suppose I ever knew.

 

Mama & Nelsie were much together while Dora & I played around

 

When Nelsie had been about two years at "the Centre" she was to have a serious illness poor girl. She was a most ardent student & sometimes rose at 6 a.m. to study. She was doing so brilliantly & taking advanced work & Mama was so proud of her. The illness was rheumatic fever & she was ill a long time. Mrs. England from the little shop helped to nurse. I remember Edith Champion used to come in every morning with a huge jug of barley water & a clean dry flannel night-shirt of her Father's. This was a real help to poor Mama. Nelsie was just getting over this illness when a wave of Russian Influenza swept the whole country. And Nelsie went down with it as did we all I believe. The effect on Nelsie was very bad. She was months getting over it. She lost her memory & could not speak at all. In all she was eight months ill. Mama took us all to Southend-on-Sea for three weeks & later she & Nelsie went to Ostend for a fortnight whilst Dora & I went to stay with Uncle George & Aunt Jenny in the Isle of Sheppey. And so Nelsie was restored to health again once more. But of course there was no going back to 'the Centre' - and her brilliant career was broken. She did however take up teaching in a private school "Sherwood School for Girls" a high class 'Ladies School' kept by Miss Lacey. She was quite happy there & received Latin & French lessons also music.

 

From now on [after the death of Dora] it was Nelsie & I. Before this I scarcely knew what she was doing unless she was playing the piano. Her studies had taken up a great deal of her time. But from now on her studies were much lighter at this new school. She had grown into a very nice-looking young woman & I thought no one else so pretty. I thought a great deal of her & so of course did Mama. She now had singing lessons from a good teacher & when we went out to tea she took her songs with her. This blossoming out of Nelsie caused us to make some new friends & she was much asked out. And we had people to musical evenings.

 

A Mr. & Mrs. Sanders & their son Percy often came. They all three had been confirmed at the same time as Nelsie & Dora. Percy & Nelsie were very friendly both being musical & studious. The two Mamas put their heads together & hoped something might come of it.

 

I now went to Miss Lacey's school where Nelsie taught. I was eleven when is [this ?] change was made. The Bank Managers of the town sent their daughters there & the better class tradespeople too. The school was a large old fashioned rambling house in Brewers St. with a very large garden. Nelsie taught the little ones. We all put on pinafores & changed our shoes. There was a visiting Latin Master - visiting French teacher & one for Mathematics. I was at the school four years & found it quite easy to be always top of the class. We took no handiwork not even needlework. Miss Lacey would not undertake to teach me music because she already had too many to teach. Mama did not pay for me at this school. Nelsie outset the fees by her teaching. I think she received about 3/- per week. Every morning we started out together passing by the grocers at the corner where the Miss McLaughlins kept shop. "What a beautiful face your sister has, we always watch for her" said the elder sister to me. After tea we often walked on the Common together.

 

In the summer we went away together just Nelsie & I.

 

[Mama] reported the University Extension Lectures to which she went with Nelsie - Mr. Wightman also went. Nelsie used to hope that as their initials were the same, people would not think the reports were hers. For Mama made people laugh & Nelsie would have been more serious & exact. Nelsie also went to a Mathematics course at the Polytechnic. She was the only girl student & was glad of Bernherd Jacobson as an escort.

 

So these four years I spent at Miss Lacey's school went quietly by. They were easy years for Nelsie & me. We did no work in the house for Mama had more help; & we were not oppressed with studies. We had the pleasure of entertaining our friends with music & song & of being entertained in return. Nelsie was very fond of Mr. Wightman I know & so was I. I thought such a lot of him & prayed that he would marry Nelsie. ! He was an engineer at Sieman's [sic] & later was to earn a big salary - but Papa spoke of him as an "artisan" & never cared much for him. He liked Percy Sanders better for he was a Churchman & he & Mama sometimes spent Sunday with his people. Mr. Wightman & Cousin Ernest were Agnostics& so was Grandma. Mr. Jacobson & Bernherd also worked at Siemans & so did Mr. Forrest who was Jessie's father. a Scotch girl Nelsie was now very friendly with. They had been at the 'Centre' together. Later on Jessie & I were to become very friendly too. There was a bitter enmity between the Jacobsons & the Forrests something to do with the Works & they were near neighbours too. Nelsie said that one day she would have to choose between them - but I liked the Jacobson's best. Jossie & Alice & Mr Jacobson.

 

A new park was now opened Maryon Park Charlton. Tennis courts were marked out but players had to provide their own nets & balls. This Nelsie did & she started a tennis club. Most of her friends joined - Jossie & Bernherd, Jessie & two of her brothers Frank & George. Alice & I went too but were not so much good being only about fourteen years old.

 

After leaving Miss Lacey's School & before I started at the 'Centre' Nelsie & I had our last holiday together. We went & stayed with Uncle George & Aunt Jenny at their farm in the Isle of Sheppy. It was my second visit there as I had spent a holiday there with Dora in 1892 while Mama & Nelsie went to Ostend. We enjoyed this with all our Cousins - Edie & Louie Reginald & Stanley. Stewart & Madge - the others - George Winnie & Alec. were in S. Africa by then. There seemed so much to eat there & so many round the table. Uncle George was very genial & Aunt Jenny very kind. But we had been a little disappointed not to sleep together. Nelsie shared Edie's room & I was with Louie & Madge.

 

But a very tragic event was about to happen & once more Death was to take its toll of our little family. On September 15th 1896 or rather 14th we had gone to school as usual & Nelsie had gone out to tea at the Jacobson's by herself - After supper Mr Wightman saw her home as he had done so many times before. She & I had just gone to bed when she remembered she had not read a letter that had come from Aunt Annie & I said "Oh read it in the morning". But she would go into Mama's room for it. After reading it we went to bed & asleep. As you know I was awakened at about 3 o'clock in the morning by the queer noise my sister was making. Thinking it was indigestion I rubbed her back. She did not speak & all was quiet. I almost thought of going to sleep again but the room was so dead quiet I felt something was wrong & called my Mother. Rather to my surprise both Mama & Papa came at once. But we were all in the dark & no matches to be found. I remember my Mother's agonising call up the stairs "For God's sake Mr. Harvey bring some matches". At last a light was got & our Father took the candle in one hand & placed his arm round Nelsie to gently raise her up. I stood in the doorway with mama while Papa was doing this. Then he said quietly "She's gone" and Mama replied "Thank God" - . It seemed Nelsie's health had been causing them some anxiety for a long time. Though it was not apparent to her friends because she hated to be asked how she was or if she was ill. But I remember her saying she was glad she was not married for how could she manage with children! And Mama's one fear was lest she herself should go & leave Nelsie behind.

 

It was a terrible upset to us all & her friends. I sat on the stairs & felt the morning would never come. I remember my surprise that life should go on as usual outside. The milkman came as he always did & workmen went by to the Arsenal. Papa had gone to Charlton to fetch Mrs. Power & Mama was moving about upstairs. I missed my sister a great deal. In fact I cried every day for 6 months. I used to sing

"As now the sun's declining rays at even tide descend

So life's brief day is sinking down to its appointed end"

 

I sang this as I washed up the tea things - But Mama put on a brave face she moved around the furniture again & re-papered the walls with bright wall paper. She had to hold up life again for Papa & me. I had the front bedroom again & Mama slept with me. We had another eight years to live in this old house. Our musical evenings were over now Nelsie was gone.10

Sources

11881 census entry.
Text From Source: 1881 census entry PRO Chancery Lane [Microfilm]
2Marion Maud Tringham nee Still, "Your Great Grand Parents - by Marion Maud Tringham nee Still".
Text From Source: Your Great Grand Parents by Marion Maud Tringham nee Still.
To my children. Brian, Maisie and Theodora

The Stills.

Your Father lived all his young days on the banks of one busy river - the Mersey & I your Mother on the banks of another - the Thames - Liverpool & Woolwich. So in a way we had the same kind of outlook - we were town-bred.
This account was sent as a word document to Graham Hoadly by Marion Maud's grandson, Roger Tringham. He had trancribed it from the original in the possesion of his cousin.

He writes:

My Grandmother wrote her account in about 1940, so there may be occasional lapses of memory.
Graham Hoadly.
3"Information from Free Births, Marriages, and Deaths website: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/" (Internet). Text From Source: Surname First name(s) District Vol Page

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Births Dec 1874
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Still Eleanor Annie Sevenoaks 2a 518
Still Eleanor Annie Sevenoaks 2a 548
Internet. Call Number: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/ (electronic).
4Marion Maud Tringham nee Still, "Your Great Grand Parents - by Marion Maud Tringham nee Still".
Text From Source: Your Great Grand Parents by Marion Maud Tringham nee Still.
To my children. Brian, Maisie and Theodora

The Stills.

Your Father lived all his young days on the banks of one busy river - the Mersey & I your Mother on the banks of another - the Thames - Liverpool & Woolwich. So in a way we had the same kind of outlook - we were town-bred.
This account was sent as a word document to Graham Hoadly by Marion Maud's grandson, Roger Tringham. He had trancribed it from the original in the possesion of his cousin.

He writes:

My Grandmother wrote her account in about 1940, so there may be occasional lapses of memory.
Text From Source: They were married in 1871 September 30th. Their first home was the Marsh Green Farm Edenbridge Kent.

The children born here were Mabel Agnes - Eleanor Annie, Harold Usborne & Lilian Dora
Graham Hoadly.
5"Kimpton / Bishop Family Bible".
Roger Tringham, Hallow, Worcestershire.
6The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, "1881 Census - Family Search Website" (Online 1881 Census for England and Wales). Custom Id: http://www.familysearch.org/Eng/Search/frameset_search.asp?PAGE=census/search_census.asp. RG11/0744/16/26.
7GRO, "1891 Census".
Microfiche.
RG12/530/7/8. Assessment: Primary evidence.
8Marion Maud Tringham nee Still, "Your Great Grand Parents - by Marion Maud Tringham nee Still".
Text From Source: Your Great Grand Parents by Marion Maud Tringham nee Still.
To my children. Brian, Maisie and Theodora

The Stills.

Your Father lived all his young days on the banks of one busy river - the Mersey & I your Mother on the banks of another - the Thames - Liverpool & Woolwich. So in a way we had the same kind of outlook - we were town-bred.
This account was sent as a word document to Graham Hoadly by Marion Maud's grandson, Roger Tringham. He had trancribed it from the original in the possesion of his cousin.

He writes:

My Grandmother wrote her account in about 1940, so there may be occasional lapses of memory.
Assessment: Primary evidence.
Text From Source: But a very tragic event was about to happen & once more Death was to take its toll of our little family. On September 15th 1896 or rather 14th we had gone to school as usual & Nelsie had gone out to tea at the Jacobson's by herself - After supper Mr Wightman saw her home as he had done so many times before. She & I had just gone to bed when she remembered she had not read a letter that had come from Aunt Annie & I said "Oh read it in the morning". But she would go into Mama's room for it. After reading it we went to bed & asleep. As you know I was awakened at about 3 o'clock in the morning by the queer noise my sister was making. Thinking it was indigestion I rubbed her back. She did not speak & all was quiet. I almost thought of going to sleep again but the room was so dead quiet I felt something was wrong & called my Mother. Rather to my surprise both Mama & Papa came at once. But we were all in the dark & no matches to be found. I remember my Mother's agonising call up the stairs "For God's sake Mr. Harvey bring some matches". At last a light was got & our Father took the candle in one hand & placed his arm round Nelsie to gently raise her up. I stood in the doorway with mama while Papa was doing this. Then he said quietly "She's gone" and Mama replied "Thank God" - .
Graham Hoadly.
9"Information from Free Births, Marriages, and Deaths website: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/" (Internet). Assessment: Secondary evidence.
Text From Source: England & Wales, FreeBMD Death Index: 1837-1983
about Eleanor Annie Still
Name: Eleanor Annie Still
Estimated birth year: abt 1875
Year of Registration: 1896
Quarter of Registration: Jul-Aug-Sep
Age at Death: 21
District: Woolwich
County: Greater London, Kent, London
Volume: 1d
Page: 746
Internet. Call Number: http://freebmd.rootsweb.com/ (electronic).
10Marion Maud Tringham nee Still, "Your Great Grand Parents - by Marion Maud Tringham nee Still".
Text From Source: Your Great Grand Parents by Marion Maud Tringham nee Still.
To my children. Brian, Maisie and Theodora

The Stills.

Your Father lived all his young days on the banks of one busy river - the Mersey & I your Mother on the banks of another - the Thames - Liverpool & Woolwich. So in a way we had the same kind of outlook - we were town-bred.
This account was sent as a word document to Graham Hoadly by Marion Maud's grandson, Roger Tringham. He had trancribed it from the original in the possesion of his cousin.

He writes:

My Grandmother wrote her account in about 1940, so there may be occasional lapses of memory.
Assessment: Primary evidence.
Graham Hoadly.